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‘I’m not like that, why treat me the same way?’ The impact of stereotyping international students on their learning, employability and connectedness with the workplace

Tran, Ly Thi and Vu, Thao Thi Phuong 2016, ‘I’m not like that, why treat me the same way?’ The impact of stereotyping international students on their learning, employability and connectedness with the workplace, Australian educational researcher, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 203-220, doi: 10.1007/s13384-015-0198-8.

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Title ‘I’m not like that, why treat me the same way?’ The impact of stereotyping international students on their learning, employability and connectedness with the workplace
Author(s) Tran, Ly ThiORCID iD for Tran, Ly Thi orcid.org/0000-0001-6543-6559
Vu, Thao Thi Phuong
Journal name Australian educational researcher
Volume number 43
Issue number 2
Start page 203
End page 220
Total pages 18
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 0311-6999
2210-5328
Keyword(s) international students
international education
employability
stereotyping
education-migration nexus
work experiences
Summary A significant body of literature on international education examines the experiences of international students in the host country. There is however a critical lack of empirical work that investigates the dynamic and complex positioning of international students within the current education-migration nexus that prevails international education in countries such as Australia, Canada and the UK. This paper addresses an important but under-researched area of the education-migration landscape by examining how the stereotyping of students as mere ‘migration hunters’ may impact their study and work experiences. It draws on a four-year research project funded by the Australian Research Council that includes more than 150 interviews and fieldwork in the Australian vocational education context. Positioning theory is used as a conceptual framework to analyse how generalising international students as ‘mere migration hunters’ has led to the disconnectedness, vulnerability and marginalization of the group of international students participating in this research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s13384-015-0198-8
Field of Research 130101 Continuing and Community Education
130103 Higher Education
130108 Technical, Further and Workplace Education
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID ARC DP0986590
Copyright notice ©2016, Australian Association for Research in Education
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081366

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.