Comparative effects of TV watching, recreational computer use, and sedentary video game play on spontaneous energy intake in male children. A randomised crossover trial.

Marsh, Samantha, Ni Mhurchu, Cliona, Jiang, Yannan and Maddison, Ralph 2014, Comparative effects of TV watching, recreational computer use, and sedentary video game play on spontaneous energy intake in male children. A randomised crossover trial., Appetite, vol. 77, pp. 13-18, doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.02.008.

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Title Comparative effects of TV watching, recreational computer use, and sedentary video game play on spontaneous energy intake in male children. A randomised crossover trial.
Author(s) Marsh, Samantha
Ni Mhurchu, Cliona
Jiang, Yannan
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 77
Start page 13
End page 18
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-06-01
ISSN 1095-8304
Keyword(s) Children
Crossover trials
Energy intake
Sedentary lifestyle
Television
Video games
Appetite
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Child
Computers
Cross-Over Studies
Eating
Humans
Male
New Zealand
Play and Playthings
Recreation
Reference Values
Summary To compare the effects of three screen-based sedentary behaviours on acute energy intake (EI) in children. Normal-weight males aged 9-13 years participated in a randomised crossover trial conducted in a laboratory setting between November 2012 and February 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand. EI during an ad libitum meal was compared for three 1-hour conditions: (1) television (TV) watching, (2) sedentary video game (VG) play, and (3) recreational computer use. The primary endpoint was total EI from food and drink. Mixed regression models were used to evaluate the treatment conditions adjusting for age, BMI, and appetite at baseline. A total of 20 participants were randomised and all completed the three conditions. Total EI from food and drink in the TV, computer, and VG conditions was estimated at 820 (SE 73.15), 685 (SE 73.33), and 696 (SE 73.16) kcal, respectively, with EI being significantly greater in the TV versus computer condition (+135; P = 0.04), a trend towards greater intake in the TV versus VG condition (+124; P = 0.06), but not significantly different between the computer and VG conditions (-10; P = 0.87). TV watching was associated with greater EI compared with computer use, and a trend towards greater EI compared with VG play.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.02.008
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081449

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition
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