Patient physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls for clinical deterioration during early hospital admission

Considine, Julie, Jones, David, Pilcher, David and Currey, Judy 2016, Patient physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls for clinical deterioration during early hospital admission, Journal of advanced nursing, vol. 72, no. 6, pp. 1287-1300, doi: 10.1111/jan.12922.

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Title Patient physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls for clinical deterioration during early hospital admission
Author(s) Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Jones, David
Pilcher, David
Currey, JudyORCID iD for Currey, Judy orcid.org/0000-0002-0574-0054
Journal name Journal of advanced nursing
Volume number 72
Issue number 6
Start page 1287
End page 1300
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 1365-2648
1365-2648
Keyword(s) emergency nursing
patient safety
rapid response teams
risk management
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nursing
RAPID RESPONSE SYSTEM
EARLY WARNING SCORE
VITAL SIGNS
AFFERENT LIMB
ABNORMAL OBSERVATIONS
RESPIRATORY RATE
TEAM ACTIVATION
MORTALITY
OUTCOMES
HYPOTENSION
Summary AIMS: To examine the relationship between physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls (medical emergency team or cardiac arrest team activation) during the first 72 hours of hospital admission. BACKGROUND: Ward adverse events are related to abnormal physiology in emergency department however the relationship between physiology at the emergency department-ward interface and ward adverse events is unknown. DESIGN: Descriptive and exploratory design. METHODS: The study involved 1980 patients at three hospitals in Melbourne Australia: i) 660 randomly selected adults admitted via the emergency department to medical or surgical wards during 2012 and who had an emergency call; and ii) 1320 adults without emergency calls matched for gender, triage category, usual residence, admitting unit and age. RESULTS/FINDINGS: The median age was 78 years and 48·8% were males. The median time to the first emergency call was 18·8 hours and ≥1 abnormal parameters were documented in 34·9% of patients during the last hour of ED care and 47·1% of patients during first hour of ward care. Emergency calls were significantly more common in patients with heart rate and conscious state abnormalities during the last hour of emergency care and abnormal oxygen saturation, heart rate or respiratory rate during the first hour of ward care. Medical emergency team afferent limb failure occurred in 55·3% patients with medical emergency team activation criteria during first hour of ward care. CONCLUSION: The use of physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface to guide care planning and reasons for and outcomes of medical emergency team afferent limb failure are important areas for future research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jan.12922
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081502

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