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Fast food restaurant locations according to socioeconomic disadvantage, urban-regional locality, and schools within Victoria, Australia

Thornton, Lukar E., Lamb, Karen E. and Ball, Kylie 2016, Fast food restaurant locations according to socioeconomic disadvantage, urban-regional locality, and schools within Victoria, Australia, SSM - population health, vol. 2, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2015.12.001.

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Title Fast food restaurant locations according to socioeconomic disadvantage, urban-regional locality, and schools within Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Thornton, Lukar E.ORCID iD for Thornton, Lukar E. orcid.org/0000-0001-8759-8671
Lamb, Karen E.ORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E. orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name SSM - population health
Volume number 2
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 2352-8273
Keyword(s) Australia
Fast food
Socioeconomic inequalities
Urbanicity
Schools
Land-use planning
Summary Features of the built environment provide opportunities to engage in both healthy and unhealthy behaviours. Access to a high number of fast food restaurants may encourage greater consumption of fast food products. The distribution of fast food restaurants at a state-level has not previously been reported in Australia. Using the location of 537 fast food restaurants from four major chains (McDonald[U+05F3]s, KFC, Hungry Jacks, and Red Rooster), this study examined fast food restaurant locations across the state of Victoria relative to area-level disadvantage, urban-regional locality (classified as Major Cities, Inner Regional, or Outer Regional), and around schools. Findings revealed greater locational access to fast food restaurants in more socioeconomically disadvantaged areas (compared to areas with lower levels of disadvantage), nearby to secondary schools (compared to primary schools), and nearby to primary and secondary schools within the most disadvantaged areas of the major city region (compared to primary and secondary schools in areas with lower levels of disadvantage). Adjusted models showed no significant difference in location according to urban-regional locality. Knowledge of the distribution of fast food restaurants in Australia will assist local authorities to target potential policy mechanisms, such as planning regulations, where they are most needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2015.12.001
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920405 Environmental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081510

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Created: Mon, 22 Feb 2016, 09:33:43 EST

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