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Experiences and perceptions of problem gamblers on cognitive and exposure therapies when taking part in a randomised controlled trial: a qualitative study

Smith, David, Pols, Rene, Lavis, Tiffany, Battersby, Malcolm and Harvey, Peter 2016, Experiences and perceptions of problem gamblers on cognitive and exposure therapies when taking part in a randomised controlled trial: a qualitative study, Journal of gambling studies, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 1243-1260, doi: 10.1007/s10899-015-9589-z.

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Title Experiences and perceptions of problem gamblers on cognitive and exposure therapies when taking part in a randomised controlled trial: a qualitative study
Author(s) Smith, David
Pols, Rene
Lavis, Tiffany
Battersby, Malcolm
Harvey, PeterORCID iD for Harvey, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2983-663X
Journal name Journal of gambling studies
Volume number 32
Issue number 4
Start page 1243
End page 1260
Total pages 18
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1573-3602
Keyword(s) Cognitive therapy
Exposure therapy
Randomized controlled trial
Qualitative study
Summary In South Australia (SA) problem gambling is mainly a result of the widespread availability of electronic gaming machines. A key treatment provider in SA offers free cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) to help-seeking problem gamblers. The CBT program focuses on the treatment of clients' urge to gamble using exposure therapy (ET) and cognitive therapy (CT) to restructure erroneous gambling beliefs. The aim of this study was to explore treatment specific and non-specific effects for CT alone and ET alone using qualitative interviews. Interviewees were a sub-sample of participants from a randomised trial that investigated the relative efficacy of CT versus ET. Findings revealed that all interviewees gained benefit from their respective therapies and their comments did not appear to favour one therapy over another. Both treatment specific and treatment non-specific effects were well supported as playing a therapeutic role to recovery. Participants' comments in both therapy groups suggested that symptom reduction was experienced on a gambling related urge-cognition continuum. In addition to symptom improvement from therapy-specific mechanisms, ET participants described a general acquisition of "rational thought" from their program of therapy and CT participants had "taken-over" their gambling urges. The findings also highlighted areas for further improvement including therapy drop-out.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10899-015-9589-z
Field of Research 1506 Tourism
1701 Psychology
1608 Sociology
111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081514

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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