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Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study

Craike, Melinda, Gaskin, Cadeyrn J., Courneya, Kerry S., Fraser, Steve F., Salmon, Jo, Owen, Patrick J., Broadbent, Suzanne and Livingston, Patricia M. 2016, Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study, Cancer medicine, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 787-794, doi: 10.1002/cam4.639.

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Title Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study
Author(s) Craike, Melinda
Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.
Courneya, Kerry S.
Fraser, Steve F.ORCID iD for Fraser, Steve F. orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-9619
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Owen, Patrick J.
Broadbent, Suzanne
Livingston, Patricia M.
Journal name Cancer medicine
Volume number 5
Issue number 5
Start page 787
End page 794
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 2045-7634
Keyword(s) Adherence
exercise
neoplasms
physical activity
prostatic neoplasms
Summary Understanding the factors that influence adherence to exercise programs is necessary to develop effective interventions for people with cancer. We examined the predictors of adherence to a supervised exercise program for participants in the ENGAGE study - a cluster randomized controlled trial that assessed the efficacy of a clinician-referred 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer. Demographic, clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial data from 52 participants in the intervention group were collected at baseline through self-report and medical records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was assessed through objective attendance records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was 80.3%. In the univariate analyses, cancer-specific quality of life subscales (role functioning r = 0.37, P = 0.01; sexual activity r = 0.26, P = 0.06; fatigue r = -0.26, P = 0.06, and hormonal symptoms r = -0.31, P = 0.03) and education (d = -0.60, P = 0.011) were associated with adherence. In the subsequent multivariate analysis, role functioning (B = 0.309, P = 0.019) and hormonal symptoms (B = -0.483, P = 0.054) independently predicted adherence. Men who experienced more severe hormonal symptoms had lower levels of adherence to the exercise program. Those who experienced more positive perceptions of their ability to perform daily tasks and leisure activities had higher levels of adherence to the exercise program. Hormonal symptoms and role functioning need to be considered when conducting exercise programs for men who have been treated for prostate cancer.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/cam4.639
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081518

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.