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Rapid directional change degrades GPS distance measurement validity during intermittent intensity running

Rawstorn, Jonathan C., Maddison, Ralph, Ali, Ajmol, Foskett, Andrew and Gant, Nicholas 2014, Rapid directional change degrades GPS distance measurement validity during intermittent intensity running, PLoS one, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093693.

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Title Rapid directional change degrades GPS distance measurement validity during intermittent intensity running
Author(s) Rawstorn, Jonathan C.ORCID iD for Rawstorn, Jonathan C. orcid.org/0000-0002-9755-7993
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Ali, Ajmol
Foskett, Andrew
Gant, Nicholas
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Orientation
Reproducibility of Results
Running
Young Adult
Summary Use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for quantifying athletic performance is common in many team sports. The effect of running velocity on measurement validity is well established, but the influence of rapid directional change is not well understood in team sport applications. This effect was systematically evaluated using multidirectional and curvilinear adaptations of a validated soccer simulation protocol that maintained identical velocity profiles. Team sport athletes completed 90 min trials of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle-running Test movement pattern on curvilinear, and multidirectional shuttle running tracks while wearing a 5 Hz (with interpolated 15 Hz output) GPS device. Reference total distance (13 200 m) was systematically over- and underestimated during curvilinear (2.61±0.80%) and shuttle (-3.17±2.46%) trials, respectively. Within-epoch measurement uncertainty dispersion was widest during the shuttle trial, particularly during the jog and run phases. Relative measurement reliability was excellent during both trials (Curvilinear r = 1.00, slope = 1.03, ICC = 1.00; Shuttle r = 0.99, slope = 0.97, ICC = 0.99). Absolute measurement reliability was superior during the curvilinear trial (Curvilinear SEM = 0 m, CV = 2.16%, LOA ± 223 m; Shuttle SEM = 119 m, CV = 2.44%, LOA ± 453 m). Rapid directional change degrades the accuracy and absolute reliability of GPS distance measurement, and caution is recommended when using GPS to quantify rapid multidirectional movement patterns.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0093693
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Rawstorn et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081520

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.