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The influence of depression and other co-occurring conditions on treatment outcomes for problem gamblers: a cohort study

Smith, David P, Battersby, Malcolm W, Harvey, Peter W, Pols, Rene G, Baigent, Michael F and Oakes, Jane E 2011, The influence of depression and other co-occurring conditions on treatment outcomes for problem gamblers: a cohort study, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 195, no. 3, pp. 56-59.

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Title The influence of depression and other co-occurring conditions on treatment outcomes for problem gamblers: a cohort study
Author(s) Smith, David P
Battersby, Malcolm W
Harvey, Peter WORCID iD for Harvey, Peter W orcid.org/0000-0003-2983-663X
Pols, Rene G
Baigent, Michael F
Oakes, Jane E
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 195
Issue number 3
Start page 56
End page 59
Total pages 4
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Summary Objective: To examine the influence of co-occurring conditions on gambling treatment outcomes.

Design, setting and participants: Prospective cohort study of problem gamblers. Participants were recruited from consecutive referrals to a gambling therapy service in 2008. Inclusion criteria were: (i) assessed as a problem gambler based on a screening interview including DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling, and (ii) suitable for admission to a treatment program. Cognitive-behavioural therapy was based on graded exposure-to-gambling urge. One-to-one treatment was conducted with 1-hour sessions weekly for up to 12 weeks.

Main outcome measures: Problem gambling screening and co-occurring conditions including depression, anxiety and alcohol use.

Results: Of 127 problem gamblers, 69 were males (54%), mean age was 43.09 years, and 65 (51%) reported a duration of problem gambling greater than 5 years. Median time for participants’ enrolment in the study was 8.9 months. Results from mixed effects logistic regression analysis indicated that individuals with higher depression levels had a greater likelihood (13% increase in odds [95% CI, 1%–25%]) of problem gambling during treatment and at follow-up.

Conclusion: Addressing depression may be associated with improved treatment outcomes in problem gambling; conversely, treatment of problem gambling improves affective instability. We therefore recommend a dual approach that treats both depression and problem gambling.
Language eng
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, Medical Journal of Australia
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081535

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.