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Participant characteristics associated with greater reductions in waist circumference during a four-month, pedometer-based, workplace health program

Freak-Poli, Rosanne L. A., Wolfe, Rory, Walls, Helen, Backholer, Kathryn and Peeters, Anna 2011, Participant characteristics associated with greater reductions in waist circumference during a four-month, pedometer-based, workplace health program, BMC public health, vol. 11, Article number: 824, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-824.

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Title Participant characteristics associated with greater reductions in waist circumference during a four-month, pedometer-based, workplace health program
Author(s) Freak-Poli, Rosanne L. A.
Wolfe, Rory
Walls, Helen
Backholer, KathrynORCID iD for Backholer, Kathryn orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 11
Season Article number: 824
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Actigraphy
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Victoria
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Workplace
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
association
prevention
risk-factor
cardiovascular disease
diabetes
physical activity
pedometer
ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY
BODY-MASS INDEX
LIFE-STYLE
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
PROMOTION PROGRAMS
ABORIGINAL PEOPLE
RISK PROFILE
PRIMARY-CARE
HIP RATIO
PREDICTORS
Summary BACKGROUND: Workplace health programs have demonstrated improvements in a number of risk factors for chronic disease. However, there has been little investigation of participant characteristics that may be associated with change in risk factors during such programs. The aim of this paper is to identify participant characteristics associated with improved waist circumference (WC) following participation in a four-month, pedometer-based, physical activity, workplace health program.

METHODS: 762 adults employed in primarily sedentary occupations and voluntarily enrolled in a four-month workplace program aimed at increasing physical activity were recruited from ten Australian worksites in 2008. Seventy-nine percent returned at the end of the health program. Data included demographic, behavioural, anthropometric and biomedical measurements. WC change (before versus after) was assessed by multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses. Seven groupings of potential associated variables from baseline were sequentially added to build progressively larger regression models.

RESULTS: Greater improvement in WC during the program was associated with having completed tertiary education, consuming two or less standard alcoholic beverages in one occasion in the twelve months prior to baseline, undertaking less baseline weekend sitting time and lower baseline total cholesterol. A greater WC at baseline was strongly associated with a greater improvement in WC. A sub-analysis in participants with a 'high-risk' baseline WC revealed that younger age, enrolling for reasons other than appearance, undertaking less weekend sitting time at baseline, eating two or more pieces of fruit per day at baseline, higher baseline physical functioning and lower baseline body mass index were associated with greater odds of moving to 'low risk' WC at the end of the program.

CONCLUSIONS: While employees with 'high-risk' WC at baseline experienced the greatest improvements in WC, the other variables associated with greater WC improvement were generally indicators of better baseline health. These results indicate that employees who started with better health, potentially due to lifestyle or recent behavioural changes, were more likely to respond positively to the program. Future health program initiators should think innovatively to encourage all enrolees along the health spectrum to achieve a successful outcome.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-824
Indigenous content on
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081570

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