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The non-advertising effects of screen-based sedentary activities on acute eating behaviours in children, adolescents, and young adults. A systematic review.

Marsh, Samantha, Ni Mhurchu, Cliona and Maddison, Ralph 2013, The non-advertising effects of screen-based sedentary activities on acute eating behaviours in children, adolescents, and young adults. A systematic review., Appetite, vol. 71, pp. 259-273, doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2013.08.017.

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Title The non-advertising effects of screen-based sedentary activities on acute eating behaviours in children, adolescents, and young adults. A systematic review.
Author(s) Marsh, Samantha
Ni Mhurchu, Cliona
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 71
Start page 259
End page 273
Total pages 15
Publisher Elseiver
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-12-01
ISSN 1095-8304
Keyword(s) Adolescents
Children
Dietary intake
Screen time
Sedentary behavior
Young adults
Adolescent
Body Mass Index
Child
Energy Intake
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Pediatric Obesity
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Assessment
Sedentary Lifestyle
Television
Video Games
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Summary Sedentary screen time may be an important determinant of childhood obesity. A number of potential mechanisms to explain the link between screen time and increased bodyweight have been proposed; however, the relationship appears to be best explained by the effects on dietary intake, which is attributed to either food advertising or effects independent of food advertising. Technological advances have allowed for greater accessibility and exposure to advertisement-free screen-based media. This review was conducted to systematically synthesise the evidence from laboratory based studies which have investigated the non-advertising effects of screen time (TV viewing, sedentary video games, and computer use) on dietary intake in children, adolescents, and young adults. MEDLINE, PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and Embase were searched from inception through 5 July 2013. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Risk of study bias was judged to range from low to high. Screen time in the absence of food advertising was consistently found to be associated with increased dietary intake compared with non-screen behaviours. Suggested explanations for this relationship included: distraction, interruption of physiologic food regulation, screen time as a conditioned cue to eat, disruption of memory formation, and the effects of the stress-induced reward system. Due to the limited number of high-quality studies available for this review, our findings are preliminary. More work is required to better establish the link between dietary intake and advertisement-free screen time and assess whether differences exist between the different screen-based activities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2013.08.017
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081657

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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