Milk: milk of monotremes and marsupials

Sharp, Julie A., Modepalli, Vengama, Enjapoori, Ashwantha, Abud, Helen E., Lefevre, Christophe and Nicholas, Kevin R. 2016, Milk: milk of monotremes and marsupialsReference module in food sciences, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp.1-10, doi: 10.1016/B978-0-08-100596-5.00910-0.

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Title Milk: milk of monotremes and marsupials
Author(s) Sharp, Julie A.ORCID iD for Sharp, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4481-5223
Modepalli, Vengama
Enjapoori, Ashwantha
Abud, Helen E.
Lefevre, Christophe
Nicholas, Kevin R.
Title of book Reference module in food sciences
Publication date 2016
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Keyword(s) bioactive
carbohydrate
development
lipid
marsupial
milk protein
monotreme
Summary Lactation has evolved from an ancient reproductive strategy which appears to have been present long before the evolution of extantmammals. The ability to lactate is a feature only found among mammals and involves a facet of maternal care where mothers secretea nutrient-rich milk which is delivered to the young by the mammary gland. Evolutionary studies indicate that lactation was establishedprior to divergence of extant mammalian lineages. It also seems that lactation evolved long before gestation in utero. Secretionsof ancestral mammary glands may have had antimicrobial properties that protected either eggs or hatchlings and organiccomponents that supplemented offspring nutrition. Over the course of evolution, lactation became a highly efficient, effectiveand adaptable means of providing maternal care for neonates. The evolution of a placenta in eutherian mammals resulted inmore extensive intrauterine development of an embryo and the ability to lactate after birth became a critical part of the reproductivestrategy of mammalian species. Following development of highly nutritious milks, evolution produced diversity in milk compositionand function, quantity of milk output, length of lactation, length of intervals between nursing and contributions of lactation tooffspring nutrition.
ISBN 9780081005965
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-08-100596-5.00910-0
Field of Research 060303 Biological Adaptation
060305 Evolution of Developmental Systems
060103 Cell Development, Proliferation and Death
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs
HERDC Research category BN.1 Other book chapter, or book chapter not attributed to Deakin
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081685

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: School of Medicine
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