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One Health approach to controlling a Q fever outbreak on an Australian goat farm

Bond, K. A., Vincent, G., Wilks, C. R., Franklin, L., Sutton, B., Stenos, J., Cowan, R., Lim, K., Athan, E., Harris, O., Macfarlane-Berry, L., Segal, Y. and Firestone, S. M. 2016, One Health approach to controlling a Q fever outbreak on an Australian goat farm, Epidemiology and infection, vol. 144, no. 6, pp. 1129-1141, doi: 10.1017/S0950268815002368.

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Title One Health approach to controlling a Q fever outbreak on an Australian goat farm
Author(s) Bond, K. A.
Vincent, G.
Wilks, C. R.
Franklin, L.
Sutton, B.
Stenos, J.
Cowan, R.
Lim, K.
Athan, E.ORCID iD for Athan, E. orcid.org/0000-0001-9838-6471
Harris, O.
Macfarlane-Berry, L.
Segal, Y.
Firestone, S. M.
Journal name Epidemiology and infection
Volume number 144
Issue number 6
Start page 1129
End page 1141
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 0950-2688
1469-4409
Summary A recent outbreak of Q fever was linked to an intensive goat and sheep dairy farm in Victoria, Australia, 2012-2014. Seventeen employees and one family member were confirmed with Q fever over a 28-month period, including two culture-positive cases. The outbreak investigation and management involved a One Health approach with representation from human, animal, environmental and public health. Seroprevalence in non-pregnant milking goats was 15% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7–27]; active infection was confirmed by positive quantitative PCR on several animal specimens. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii DNA obtained from goat and human specimens was identical by two typing methods. A number of farming practices probably contributed to the outbreak, with similar precipitating factors to the Netherlands outbreak, 2007-2012. Compared to workers in a high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filtered factory, administrative staff in an unfiltered adjoining office and those regularly handling goats and kids had 5·49 (95% CI 1·29–23·4) and 5·65 (95% CI 1·09–29·3) times the risk of infection, respectively; suggesting factory workers were protected from windborne spread of organisms. Reduction in the incidence of human cases was achieved through an intensive human vaccination programme plus environmental and biosecurity interventions. Subsequent non-occupational acquisition of Q fever in the spouse of an employee, indicates that infection remains endemic in the goat herd, and remains a challenge to manage without source control.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0950268815002368
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081712

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.