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The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review

Driscoll, Don A., Banks, Sam C., Barton, Philip S., Ikin, Karen, Lentini, Pia, Lindenmayer, David B., Smith, Annabel L., Berry, Laurence E., Burns, Emma L., Edworthy, Amanda, Evans, Maldwyn J., Gibson, Rebecca, Heinsohn, Rob, Howland, Brett, Kay, Geoff, Munro, Nicola, Scheele, Ben C., Stirnemann, Ingrid, Stojanovic, Dejan, Sweaney, Nici, Villaseñor, Nelida R. and Westgate, Martin J. 2014, The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review, PLoS one, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095053.

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Title The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review
Author(s) Driscoll, Don A.ORCID iD for Driscoll, Don A. orcid.org/0000-0002-1560-5235
Banks, Sam C.
Barton, Philip S.
Ikin, Karen
Lentini, Pia
Lindenmayer, David B.
Smith, Annabel L.
Berry, Laurence E.
Burns, Emma L.
Edworthy, Amanda
Evans, Maldwyn J.
Gibson, Rebecca
Heinsohn, Rob
Howland, Brett
Kay, Geoff
Munro, Nicola
Scheele, Ben C.
Stirnemann, Ingrid
Stojanovic, Dejan
Sweaney, Nici
Villaseñor, Nelida R.
Westgate, Martin J.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Ecology
Empirical Research
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Summary Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management decisions. Ambitious, multi-disciplinary research programs studying many species are critical for advancing dispersal research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095053
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081775

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.