You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Population, behavioural and physiological responses of an urban population of black swans to an intense annual noise event

Payne, Catherine J., Jessop, Tim S., Guay, Patrick-Jean, Johnstone, Michele, Feore, Megan and Mulder, Raoul A. 2012, Population, behavioural and physiological responses of an urban population of black swans to an intense annual noise event, PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 9, Article Number : e45014, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045014.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
jessop-populationbehavioural-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 3.25MB 10

Title Population, behavioural and physiological responses of an urban population of black swans to an intense annual noise event
Author(s) Payne, Catherine J.
Jessop, Tim S.ORCID iD for Jessop, Tim S. orcid.org/0000-0002-7712-4373
Guay, Patrick-Jean
Johnstone, Michele
Feore, Megan
Mulder, Raoul A.
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 7
Issue number 9
Season Article Number : e45014
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Wild animals in urban environments are exposed to a broad range of human activities that have the potential to disturb their life history and behaviour. Wildlife responses to disturbance can range from emigration to modified behaviour, or elevated stress, but these responses are rarely evaluated in concert. We simultaneously examined population, behavioural and hormonal responses of an urban population of black swans Cygnus atratus before, during and after an annual disturbance event involving large crowds and intense noise, the Australian Formula One Grand Prix. Black swan population numbers were lowest one week before the event and rose gradually over the course of the study, peaking after the event, suggesting that the disturbance does not trigger mass emigration. We also found no difference in the proportion of time spent on key behaviours such as locomotion, foraging, resting or self-maintenance over the course of the study. However, basal and capture stress-induced corticosterone levels showed significant variation, consistent with a modest physiological response. Basal plasma corticosterone levels were highest before the event and decreased over the course of the study. Capture-induced stress levels peaked during the Grand Prix and then also declined over the remainder of the study. Our results suggest that even intensely noisy and apparently disruptive events may have relatively low measurable short-term impact on population numbers, behaviour or physiology in urban populations with apparently high tolerance to anthropogenic disturbance. Nevertheless, the potential long-term impact of such disturbance on reproductive success, individual fitness and population health will need to be carefully evaluated.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0045014
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
050204 Environmental Impact Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081781

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 99 Abstract Views, 12 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 29 Feb 2016, 11:16:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.