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Prey selection, size, and breakage differences in Turbo undulatus opercula found within Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) middens compared to Aboriginal middens and natural beach deposits, southeast Australia

Sherwood, John, McNiven, Ian J., Laurenson, Laurie, Richards, Thomas and Bowler, Jim 2016, Prey selection, size, and breakage differences in Turbo undulatus opercula found within Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) middens compared to Aboriginal middens and natural beach deposits, southeast Australia, Journal of archaeological science: reports, vol. 6, pp. 14-23, doi: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.01.018.

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Title Prey selection, size, and breakage differences in Turbo undulatus opercula found within Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) middens compared to Aboriginal middens and natural beach deposits, southeast Australia
Formatted title Prey selection, size, and breakage differences in Turbo undulatus opercula found within Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) middens compared to Aboriginal middens and natural beach deposits, southeast Australia
Author(s) Sherwood, John
McNiven, Ian J.
Laurenson, LaurieORCID iD for Laurenson, Laurie orcid.org/0000-0003-2321-7512
Richards, Thomas
Bowler, Jim
Journal name Journal of archaeological science: reports
Volume number 6
Start page 14
End page 23
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 2352-409X
Keyword(s) prey selection
taphonomy
Turbo
Aboriginal middens
bird middens
beach deposits
southeast Australia
Summary Qualitative discrimination criteria are employed commonly to distinguish cultural shell middens from natural shell deposits. Quantitative discrimination criteria remain less developed beyond an assumption that natural shell beds tend to contain a wider range of shell sizes compared to cultural shell middens. This study further tests this assumption and provides the first comparative quantitative analysis of shell sizes from cultural middens, bird middens, and beach shell beds. Size distributions of opercula of the marine gastropod Turbo undulatus within two modern Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) middens are compared with two Aboriginal middens (early and late Holocene) and two modern beach deposits from southeast Australia. Results reveal statistically significant differences between bird middens and other types of shell deposits, and that opercula size distributions are useful to distinguish Aboriginal middens from bird middens but not from beach deposits. Supplementary qualitative analysis of taphonomic alteration of opercula reveal similar opercula breakage patterns in human and bird middens, and further support previously recognised criteria to distinguished beach deposits (water rolling and bioerosion) and human middens (burning). Although Pacific Gulls are geographically restricted to southern Australia, the known capacity of gulls (Larus spp.) in other coastal contexts around the world to accumulate shell deposits indicates the broader methodological relevance of our study.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.01.018
Field of Research 210102 Archaeological Science
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081838

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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