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Do ENSO and coastal development enhance coastal burial of terrestrial carbon?

Macreadie, Peter I., Rolph, Timothy C., Boyd, Ron, Schröder-Adams, Claudia J. and Skilbeck, Charles G. 2015, Do ENSO and coastal development enhance coastal burial of terrestrial carbon?, PLoS one, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0145136.

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Title Do ENSO and coastal development enhance coastal burial of terrestrial carbon?
Author(s) Macreadie, Peter I.ORCID iD for Macreadie, Peter I. orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Rolph, Timothy C.
Boyd, Ron
Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.
Skilbeck, Charles G.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 10
Issue number 12
Article ID e0145136
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Carbon cycling on the east coast of Australia has the potential to be strongly affected by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) intensification and coastal development (industrialization and urbanization). We performed paleoreconstructions of estuarine sediments from a seagrass-dominated estuary on the east coast of Australia (Tuggerah Lake, New South Wales) to test the hypothesis that millennial-scale ENSO intensification and European settlement in Australia have increased the transfer of organic carbon from land into coastal waters. Our data show that carbon accumulation rates within coastal sediments increased significantly during periods of maximum millennial-scale ENSO intensity ("super-ENSO") and coastal development. We suggest that ENSO and coastal development destabilize and liberate terrestrial soil carbon, which, during rainfall events (e.g., La Niña), washes into estuaries and becomes trapped and buried by coastal vegetation (seagrass in this case). Indeed, periods of high carbon burial were generally characterized as having rapid sedimentation rates, higher content of fine-grained sediments, and increased content of wood and charcoal fragments. These results, though preliminary, suggest that coastal development and ENSO intensificationboth of which are predicted to increase over the coming centurycan enhance capture and burial of terrestrial carbon by coastal ecosystems. These findings have important relevance for current efforts to build an understanding of terrestrial- marine carbon connectivity into global carbon budgets.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0145136
Field of Research 050102 Ecosystem Function
050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081858

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.