Visual impairment in Australia: distance visual acuity, near vision, and visual field findings of the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project

Taylor, Hugh R., Livingston, Patricia M., Stanislavsky, Yury L. and McCarty, Catherine A. 1997, Visual impairment in Australia: distance visual acuity, near vision, and visual field findings of the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project, American journal of ophthalmology, vol. 123, no. 3, pp. 328-337, doi: 10.1016/S0002-9394(14)70128-X.

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Title Visual impairment in Australia: distance visual acuity, near vision, and visual field findings of the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project
Author(s) Taylor, Hugh R.
Livingston, Patricia M.ORCID iD for Livingston, Patricia M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6616-3839
Stanislavsky, Yury L.
McCarty, Catherine A.
Journal name American journal of ophthalmology
Volume number 123
Issue number 3
Start page 328
End page 337
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 1997-03
ISSN 0002-9394
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ophthalmology
POPULATION
BALTIMORE
EYE
Summary PURPOSE: To describe the age-specific and gender-specific rates of blindness and visual impairment in urban adults aged 40 years and older. METHODS: A population-based sample of residents was recruited. Presenting and best-corrected distance visual acuities were assessed. Functional near vision was measured at each participant's preferred distance. Visual field examination was performed with a Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA); those unable to perform the field analyzer test attempted a Bjerrum screen or confrontation field. RESULTS: The study population comprised 3,271 residents (83% of eligible) from ages 40 to 98 years; 54% were women. Overall, 56% of the study population wore distance correction; this was significantly lower in men but higher in the older age groups. Age-adjusted rates of blindness were 0.066% in men and 0.170% in women. Vision with current correction improved after refraction by gender and age. Direct age-standardized rates of functional near vision did not vary significantly by gender. Forty-six people had significant visual field loss in their better eye. The proportion of participants with constriction of the visual field to within 20 degrees of fixation was similar for men and women when controlled for age (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.44 to 1.49) but increased significantly with age controlled for gender. Visual field abnormalities were detected in 548 right eyes (17%) and 533 left eyes (16%). CONCLUSIONS: Although overall rates of blindness because of visual acuity loss were relatively low, nearly three times more people had visual impairment because of visual field loss than visual acuity loss. These results highlight the need to target blindness prevention programs to the aging population, with a special emphasis on women.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/S0002-9394(14)70128-X
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1113 Ophthalmology And Optometry
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1997, American Journal of Ophthalmology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081868

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