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How the observed create ethical dilemmas for the observers: experiences from studies conducted in clinical settings in the UK and Australia

Bloomer, Melissa J., Doman, Maggie and Endacott, Ruth 2013, How the observed create ethical dilemmas for the observers: experiences from studies conducted in clinical settings in the UK and Australia, Nursing & health sciences, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 410-414, doi: 10.1111/nhs.12052.

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Title How the observed create ethical dilemmas for the observers: experiences from studies conducted in clinical settings in the UK and Australia
Author(s) Bloomer, Melissa J.ORCID iD for Bloomer, Melissa J. orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-3951
Doman, Maggie
Endacott, Ruth
Journal name Nursing & health sciences
Volume number 15
Issue number 4
Start page 410
End page 414
Total pages 5
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 1441-0745
Keyword(s) Data Collection
Observer Variation
Pediatric Nursing
Personal Autonomy
Terminal Care
Summary Observational research has a history of controversy, particularly when the research is conducted in a clinical setting. Existing ethical approval processes focus on protecting participants and the researcher's responsibilities, in particular where vulnerable populations are concerned. In this study, the authors explored the less overt and often understated ethical challenges that can arise when conducting observational research in a clinical setting. Reflecting on two recent studies conducted in different clinical settings, the authors described the challenges of blurring role boundaries, the risk of collecting redundant data, and the impact of reverse power relationships between researchers, clinicians, and managers. From their experiences, the authors suggested that the preparatory work undertaken with clinicians and managers onsite, which typically focuses on how the researchers will maintain the ethical robustness of the research and protect the rights of participants and the vulnerable, should also highlight the sometimes overlooked ethical issues associated with participatory research. This can help ensure that participants and managers understand the scope and limitations of the research, and consider the ways in which the observed can influence the researcher and the findings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/nhs.12052
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081907

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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