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Extending boundaries: clinical communication with culturally and linguistically diverse mental health clients and carers

Cross, Wendy M. and Bloomer, Melissa J. 2010, Extending boundaries: clinical communication with culturally and linguistically diverse mental health clients and carers, International journal of mental health nursing, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 268-277, doi: 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00667.x.

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Title Extending boundaries: clinical communication with culturally and linguistically diverse mental health clients and carers
Author(s) Cross, Wendy M.
Bloomer, Melissa J.ORCID iD for Bloomer, Melissa J. orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-3951
Journal name International journal of mental health nursing
Volume number 19
Issue number 4
Start page 268
End page 277
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2010-08
ISSN 1445-8330
1447-0349
Summary We are often confronted with the dilemmas of interacting with people from different cultural backgrounds. How do we ensure that we meet their needs, if they have some barriers to communicating those needs? This project explores the communication mechanisms used by mental health clinicians, to explore how they modify their communication to reconcile cultural differences and promote self-disclosure. It also identifies the practical experiences that have enlightened clinicians' practice when interacting with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups. Through focus groups, mental health clinicians were probed about their experiences with CALD groups and the methods used to facilitate communication. Clinicians were working in either acute adult inpatient or community settings in a large metropolitan health service. Fifty-three clinicians formed 7 focus groups. In the focus groups, clinicians were asked about their perceptions of communication with CALD clients. Guided questions were used. All focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed. Two distinct themes emerged. They were ‘respect’ and ‘cultural understanding’. The clinicians recognized that showing and maintaining respect for the CALD client, and their families significantly impacted on the development of a therapeutic relationship. Showing cultural understanding and acceptance for difference also enhanced communication.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1447-0349.2010.00667.x
Field of Research 111005 Mental Health Nursing
1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081919

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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