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The acute effects of exercise on cigarette cravings, withdrawal symptoms, affect, and smoking behaviour: systematic review update and meta-analysis

Roberts, Vaughan, Maddison, Ralph, Simpson, Caroline, Bullen, Chris and Prapavessis, Harry 2012, The acute effects of exercise on cigarette cravings, withdrawal symptoms, affect, and smoking behaviour: systematic review update and meta-analysis, Psychopharmacology, vol. 222, no. 1, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1007/s00213-012-2731-z.

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Title The acute effects of exercise on cigarette cravings, withdrawal symptoms, affect, and smoking behaviour: systematic review update and meta-analysis
Author(s) Roberts, Vaughan
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Simpson, Caroline
Bullen, Chris
Prapavessis, Harry
Journal name Psychopharmacology
Volume number 222
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 1432-2072
1432-2072
Keyword(s) nicotine
exercise
physical activity
smoking cessation
affect
smoking topography
tobacco withdrawal symptoms
cigarette cravings
behavioural intervention
Summary RATIONALE: Smoking cessation is associated with cigarette cravings and tobacco withdrawal symptoms (TWS), and exercise appears to ameliorate many of these negative effects. A number of studies have examined the relationships between exercise, cigarette cravings, and TWS. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (a) to review and update the literature examining the effects of short bouts of exercise on cigarette cravings, TWS, affect, and smoking behaviour and (b) to conduct meta-analyses of the effect of exercise on cigarette cravings. METHODS: A systematic review of all studies published between January 2006 and June 2011 was conducted. RESULTS: Fifteen new studies were identified, 12 of which found a positive effect of exercise on cigarette cravings. The magnitude of statistically significant effect sizes for 'desire to smoke' and 'strength of desire to smoke' ranged from 0.4 to 1.98 in favour of exercise compared to passive control conditions, and peaked either during or soon after treatment. Effects were found up to 30 min post-exercise. Cigarette cravings were reduced following exercise with a wide range of intensities from isometric exercise and yoga to activity as high as 80-85 % heart rate reserve. Meta-analyses revealed weighted mean differences of -1.90 and -2.41 in 'desire to smoke' and 'strength of desire to smoke' outcomes, respectively. Measures of TWS and negative affect were reduced following light-moderate intensity exercise, but increased during vigorous exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Exercise can have a positive effect on cigarette cravings and TWS. However, the most effective exercise intensity to reduce cravings and the underlying mechanisms associated with this effect remain unclear.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00213-012-2731-z
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Springer-Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081947

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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