You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

A theory-based video messaging mobile phone intervention for smoking cessation: randomized controlled trial

Whittaker, Robyn, Dorey, Enid, Bramley, Dale, Bullen, Chris, Denny, Simon, Elley, C Raina, Maddison, Ralph, McRobbie, Hayden, Parag, Varsha, Rodgers, Anthony and Salmon, Penny 2011, A theory-based video messaging mobile phone intervention for smoking cessation: randomized controlled trial, Journal of medical internet research, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.2196/jmir.1553.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
maddison-theorybasedvideomsg-2011.pdf Published version application/pdf 633.36KB 2

Title A theory-based video messaging mobile phone intervention for smoking cessation: randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Whittaker, Robyn
Dorey, Enid
Bramley, Dale
Bullen, Chris
Denny, Simon
Elley, C Raina
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
McRobbie, Hayden
Parag, Varsha
Rodgers, Anthony
Salmon, Penny
Journal name Journal of medical internet research
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher JMIR Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Canada
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1438-8871
Keyword(s) smoking cessation
cellular phone
mobile phone
Summary BACKGROUND: Advances in technology allowed the development of a novel smoking cessation program delivered by video messages sent to mobile phones. This social cognitive theory-based intervention (called "STUB IT") used observational learning via short video diary messages from role models going through the quitting process to teach behavioral change techniques.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to assess the effectiveness of a multimedia mobile phone intervention for smoking cessation.

METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 6-month follow-up. Participants had to be 16 years of age or over, be current daily smokers, be ready to quit, and have a video message-capable phone. Recruitment targeted younger adults predominantly through radio and online advertising. Registration and data collection were completed online, prompted by text messages. The intervention group received an automated package of video and text messages over 6 months that was tailored to self-selected quit date, role model, and timing of messages. Extra messages were available on demand to beat cravings and address lapses. The control group also set a quit date and received a general health video message sent to their phone every 2 weeks.

RESULTS: The target sample size was not achieved due to difficulty recruiting young adult quitters. Of the 226 randomized participants, 47% (107/226) were female and 24% (54/226) were Maori (indigenous population of New Zealand). Their mean age was 27 years (SD 8.7), and there was a high level of nicotine addiction. Continuous abstinence at 6 months was 26.4% (29/110) in the intervention group and 27.6% (32/116) in the control group (P = .8). Feedback from participants indicated that the support provided by the video role models was important and appreciated.

CONCLUSIONS: This study was not able to demonstrate a statistically significant effect of the complex video messaging mobile phone intervention compared with simple general health video messages via mobile phone. However, there was sufficient positive feedback about the ease of use of this novel intervention, and the support obtained by observing the role model video messages, to warrant further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1553
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081948

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 54 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 46 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2016, 11:21:41 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.