You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Do enhancements to the urban built environment improve physical activity levels among socially disadvantaged populations?

Pearce, Jamie R. and Maddison, Ralph 2011, Do enhancements to the urban built environment improve physical activity levels among socially disadvantaged populations?, International journal for equity in health, vol. 10, Article number: 28, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1475-9276-10-28.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
maddison-doenhancementstotheurban-2011.pdf Published version application/pdf 508.19KB 3

Title Do enhancements to the urban built environment improve physical activity levels among socially disadvantaged populations?
Author(s) Pearce, Jamie R.
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Journal name International journal for equity in health
Volume number 10
Season Article number: 28
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 1475-9276
Keyword(s) physical activity
neighbourhoods
connectivity
open space
green space
health inequalities
New Zealand
Summary Background: There is growing recognition that the urban built environment influences physical activity at the population level, although the effects on disadvantaged groups are less well understood. Using the examples of open/green space and street connectivity, this paper explores whether enhancements to the built environment have potential for addressing physical activity-related health inequalities among Mori, Pacific and low income communities in New Zealand.

Method: A high-level review of the international literature relating open space and street connectivity to physical activity and/or related health outcomes at a population level was completed. Consideration was given to whether these features of the built environment have a disproportionate effect on disadvantaged populations.

Results: Findings from international studies suggest that open space and street connectivity have a beneficial effect on physical activity. Enhancing the built environment may be particularly advantageous for improving physical activity levels among disadvantaged populations.

Conclusion: It is likely that open space and street connectivity have a positive effect on physical activity behaviour; however due to the cross-sectional nature of existing research and the paucity of research among disadvantaged populations definitive conclusions about the effect in these populations cannot be made. Further research is required (e.g. natural experiments or quasi experimental research designs) to determine the effect of changing the environment on physical activity and obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1475-9276-10-28
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081952

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 21 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2016, 11:55:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.