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Effects of active video games on body composition: a randomized controlled trial

Maddison, Ralph, Foley, Louise, Mhurchu, Cliona Ni, Jiang, Yannan, Jull, Aandrew, Prapavessis, Harry, Hohepa, Maea and Rodgers, Anthony 2011, Effects of active video games on body composition: a randomized controlled trial, American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 94, no. 1, pp. 156-163, doi: 10.3945/ajcn.110.009142.

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Title Effects of active video games on body composition: a randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Foley, Louise
Mhurchu, Cliona Ni
Jiang, Yannan
Jull, Aandrew
Prapavessis, Harry
Hohepa, Maea
Rodgers, Anthony
Journal name American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 94
Issue number 1
Start page 156
End page 163
Total pages 8
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Place of publication Rockville, Md.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 1938-3207
Summary BACKGROUND: Sedentary activities such as video gaming are independently associated with obesity. Active video games, in which players physically interact with images on screen, may help increase physical activity and improve body composition.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of active video games over a 6-mo period on weight, body composition, physical activity, and physical fitness.

DESIGN: We conducted a 2-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial in Auckland, New Zealand. A total of 322 overweight and obese children aged 10-14 y, who were current users of sedentary video games, were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive either an active video game upgrade package (intervention, n = 160) or to have no change (control group, n = 162). The primary outcome was the change from baseline in body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). Secondary outcomes were changes in percentage body fat, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, video game play, and food snacking.

RESULTS: At 24 wk, the treatment effect on BMI (-0.24; 95% CI: -0.44, -0.05; P = 0.02) favored the intervention group. The change (±SE) in BMI from baseline increased in the control group (0.34 ± 0.08) but remained the same in the intervention group (0.09 ± 0.08). There was also evidence of a reduction in body fat in the intervention group (-0.83%; 95% CI: -1.54%, -0.12%; P = 0.02). The change in daily time spent playing active video games at 24 wk increased (10.03 min; 95% CI: 6.26, 13.81 min; P < 0.0001) with the intervention accompanied by a reduction in the change in daily time spent playing nonactive video games (-9.39 min; 95% CI: -19.38, 0.59 min; P = 0.06).

CONCLUSION: An active video game intervention has a small but definite effect on BMI and body composition in overweight and obese children.
Language eng
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.110.009142
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, American Society for Nutrition
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights http://www.nutrition.org/publications/guidelines-and-policies/license/
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081953

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.