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It's not just the television: survey analysis of sedentary behaviour in New Zealand young people

Foley, Louise S., Maddison, Ralph, Jiang, Yannan, Olds, Timothy and Ridley, Kate 2011, It's not just the television: survey analysis of sedentary behaviour in New Zealand young people, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 8, Article number: 132, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-8-132.

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Title It's not just the television: survey analysis of sedentary behaviour in New Zealand young people
Author(s) Foley, Louise S.
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Jiang, Yannan
Olds, Timothy
Ridley, Kate
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 8
Season Article number: 132
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) sedentary behaviour
self-report
accelerometry
cross-sectional survey
Summary BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour has been linked with adverse health outcomes in young people; however, the nature and context of being sedentary is poorly understood. Accurate quantification and description of sedentary behaviour using population-level data is required. The aim of this research was to describe sedentary behaviour among New Zealand (NZ) youth and examine whether sedentary behaviour differs by Body Mass Index (BMI) status in this population.

METHODS: A national representative cross-sectional survey of young people aged 5-24 years (n = 2,503) was conducted in 2008-2009. Data from this survey, which included subjectively (recall diary; n = 1,309) and objectively (accelerometry; n = 960) measured sedentary behaviour for participants aged 10-18 years were analysed using survey weighted methods.

RESULTS: Participants self-reported spending on average 521 minutes per day (standard error [SE] 5.29) in total sedentary behaviour, 181 minutes per day (SE 3.91) in screen-based sedentary activities (e.g., television and video games), and 340 minutes per day (SE 5.22) in other non-screen sedentary behaviours (e.g., school, passive transport and self-care). Accelerometer-measured total sedentary behaviour was on average 420 minutes per day (SE 4.26), or 53% (SE 0.42%) of monitored time. There were no statistically significant differences in time spent in sedentary behaviour among overweight, obese and healthy/underweight young people.

CONCLUSIONS: Both subjective and objective methods indicate that NZ youth spend much of their waking time being sedentary. No relationships were found between sedentary behaviour and BMI status. These findings extend previous research by describing engagement in specific sedentary activities, as well as quantifying the behaviour using an objective method. Differences in what aspects of sedentary behaviour the two methods are capturing are discussed. This research highlights the potential for future interventions to target specific sedentary behaviours or demographic groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-8-132
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081955

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.