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Screen-time weight-loss intervention targeting children at home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial study protocol

Maddison, Ralph, Mhurchu, Cliona Ni, Foley, Louise, Epstein, Leonard, Jiang, Yannan, Tsai, Midi, Dewes, Ofa and Heke, Ihirangi 2011, Screen-time weight-loss intervention targeting children at home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial study protocol, BMC public health, vol. 11, no. 524, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-524.

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Title Screen-time weight-loss intervention targeting children at home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial study protocol
Author(s) Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Mhurchu, Cliona Ni
Foley, Louise
Epstein, Leonard
Jiang, Yannan
Tsai, Midi
Dewes, Ofa
Heke, Ihirangi
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 11
Issue number 524
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1471-2458
Summary BACKGROUND: Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33%) do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet.

METHODS/DESIGN: The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention) or control (no change). At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI) and standardized body mass index (zBMI). Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity.

DISCUSSION: This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous), Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight management programs..
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-524
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081959

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.