You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Feasibility, design and conduct of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to reduce overweight and obesity in children: the electronic games to aid motivation to exercise (eGAME) study

Maddison, Ralph, Foley, Louise, Mhurchu, Cliona Ni, Jull, Andrew, Jiang, Yannan, Prapavessis, Harry, Rodgers, Anthony, Vander Hoorn, Stephen, Hohepa, Maea and Schaaf, David 2009, Feasibility, design and conduct of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to reduce overweight and obesity in children: the electronic games to aid motivation to exercise (eGAME) study, BMC public health, vol. 9, Article number: 146, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-9-146.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
maddison-feasibilitydesignandconduct-2009.pdf Published version application/pdf 434.85KB 6

Title Feasibility, design and conduct of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to reduce overweight and obesity in children: the electronic games to aid motivation to exercise (eGAME) study
Author(s) Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Foley, Louise
Mhurchu, Cliona Ni
Jull, Andrew
Jiang, Yannan
Prapavessis, Harry
Rodgers, Anthony
Vander Hoorn, Stephen
Hohepa, Maea
Schaaf, David
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 9
Season Article number: 146
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) adipose tissue
adolescent
body mass index (BMI)
child
diet records
exercise
female
humans
male
monitoring
motivation
obesity
overweight
pilot projects
video games
physiologic
Summary BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in developed countries. Sedentary screen-based activities such as video gaming are thought to displace active behaviors and are independently associated with obesity. Active video games, where players physically interact with images onscreen, may have utility as a novel intervention to increase physical activity and improve body composition in children. The aim of the Electronic Games to Aid Motivation to Exercise (eGAME) study is to determine the effects of an active video game intervention over 6 months on: body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference, cardio-respiratory fitness, and physical activity levels in overweight children.

METHODS/DESIGN: Three hundred and thirty participants aged 10-14 years will be randomized to receive either an active video game upgrade package or to a control group (no intervention).

DISCUSSION: An overview of the eGAME study is presented, providing an example of a large, pragmatic randomized controlled trial in a community setting. Reflection is offered on key issues encountered during the course of the study. In particular, investigation into the feasibility of the proposed intervention, as well as robust testing of proposed study procedures is a critical step prior to implementation of a large-scale trial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-9-146
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30081975

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 80 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Mar 2016, 14:42:16 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.