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Comparison of two modes of delivery of an exercise prescription scheme

Foley, Louise, Maddison, Ralph, Jones, Zanta, Brown, Paul and Davys, Anne 2011, Comparison of two modes of delivery of an exercise prescription scheme, New Zealand medical journal, vol. 124.


Title Comparison of two modes of delivery of an exercise prescription scheme
Author(s) Foley, Louise
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Jones, Zanta
Brown, Paul
Davys, Anne
Journal name New Zealand medical journal
Volume number 124
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Place of publication Wellington, N.Z.
Publication date 2011-07-08
ISSN 1175-8716
Summary SummaryGreen Prescription (GRx) is a referral from a health professional for a patient to become more physically active. In Auckland, GRx is delivered either on the telephone or face-to-face. A comparison of the two modes of delivery (telephone vs. face-to-face) was conducted. This evaluation involved staff interviews, patient interviews and analysis of GRx records for the 2007 calendar year. Results indicated that the modes of delivery were similar in terms of costs as well as outcomes. However, the face-to-face mode of delivery was more popular with Maori and Pacific peoples. Providing a choice of GRx mode of delivery allows participants to choose based on their personal and cultural needs.AbstractAimGreen Prescription (GRx) referrals from health professionals have been shown to be effective for increasing the physical activity levels of patients. Little is known about which methods of delivering the programme represents the best value for money. The purpose of this paper was to compare the cost and outcomes of two modes of delivery of a GRx programme. One mode offered phone support involving monthly telephone calls over a 3-4 month period to encourage physical activity participation. A second mode offered community support via weekly face-to-face support group meetings in which physical activities were offered.MethodThe evaluation involved staff interviews, patient interviews and analysis of GRx records for the 2007 calendar year.ResultsThere was a large rate of drop-out (68%) from GRx referral to registration. For those who registered, there was a clear preference for community support, and engagement of Māori and Pacific peoples was higher in this mode of delivery. The proportion (but not absolute number) of people who successfully completed their mode of delivery was higher with phone support. However, participants in community support self-reported a significantly greater number of days of exercise per week than those in phone support. The total expected cost per person for phone support was $102.07 and $108.15 for community support. A greater proportion of participants in community support were very satisfied overall with their mode of delivery.ConclusionThe two modes were comparable in cost and outcomes, though there was greater penetration of target ethnic populations in community support. Providing a choice of GRx mode of delivery allows participants to choose based on their personal and cultural needs.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, New Zealand Medical Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082044

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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