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Couch potatoes to jumping beans: a pilot study of the effect of active video games on physical activity in children

Ni Mhurchu, Cliona, Maddison, Ralph, Jiang, Yannan, Jull, Andrew, Prapavessis, Harry and Rodgers, Anthony 2008, Couch potatoes to jumping beans: a pilot study of the effect of active video games on physical activity in children, International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity, vol. 5, Article number : 8, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-5-8.

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Title Couch potatoes to jumping beans: a pilot study of the effect of active video games on physical activity in children
Author(s) Ni Mhurchu, Cliona
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Jiang, Yannan
Jull, Andrew
Prapavessis, Harry
Rodgers, Anthony
Journal name International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 5
Season Article number : 8
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary The primary objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of active video games on children's physical activity levels.Twenty children (mean +/- SD age = 12 +/- 1.5 years; 40% female) were randomised to receive either an active video game upgrade package or to a control group (no intervention). Effects on physical activity over the 12-week intervention period were measured using objective (Actigraph accelerometer) and subjective (Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children [PAQ-C]) measures. An activity log was used to estimate time spent playing active and non-active video games.Children in the intervention group spent less mean time over the total 12-week intervention period playing all video games compared to those in the control group (54 versus 98 minutes/day [difference = -44 minutes/day, 95% CI [-92, 2]], p = 0.06). Average time spent in all physical activities measured with an accelerometer was higher in the active video game intervention group compared to the control group (difference at 6 weeks = 194 counts/min, p = 0.04, and at 12 weeks = 48 counts/min, p = 0.06).This preliminary study suggests that playing active video games on a regular basis may have positive effects on children's overall physical activity levels. Further research is needed to confirm if playing these games over a longer period of time could also have positive effects on children's body weight and body mass index.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-5-8
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2008, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082045

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.