Specific mood symptoms confer risk for subsequent suicidal ideation in bipolar disorder with and without suicide attempt history: multi-wave data from STEP-BD

Stange, Jonathan P., Kleiman, Evan M., Sylvia, Louisa G., da Silva Magalhães, Pedro Vieira, Berk, Michael, Nierenberg, Andrew A. and Deckersbach, Thilo 2016, Specific mood symptoms confer risk for subsequent suicidal ideation in bipolar disorder with and without suicide attempt history: multi-wave data from STEP-BD, Depression and anxiety, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 464-472, doi: 10.1002/da.22464.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Specific mood symptoms confer risk for subsequent suicidal ideation in bipolar disorder with and without suicide attempt history: multi-wave data from STEP-BD
Author(s) Stange, Jonathan P.
Kleiman, Evan M.
Sylvia, Louisa G.
da Silva Magalhães, Pedro Vieira
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Nierenberg, Andrew A.
Deckersbach, Thilo
Journal name Depression and anxiety
Volume number 33
Issue number 6
Start page 464
End page 472
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 1520-6394
Keyword(s) bipolar disorder
cognition
depression
mood disorders
suicide/self-harm
Summary BACKGROUND: Little is known about specific mood symptoms that may confer risk for suicidal ideation (SI) among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We evaluated prospectively whether particular symptoms of depression and mania precede the onset or worsening of SI, among adults with or without a history of a suicide attempt. METHODS: We examined prospective data from a large (N = 2,741) cohort of patients participating in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD). We evaluated history of suicide attempts at baseline, and symptoms of depression and mania at baseline and follow-up visits. Hierarchical linear modeling tested whether specific mood symptoms predicted subsequent levels of SI, and whether the strength of the associations differed based on suicide attempt history, after accounting for the influence of other mood symptoms and current SI. RESULTS: Beyond overall current depression and mania symptom severity, baseline SI, and illness characteristics, several mood symptoms, including guilt, reduced self-esteem, psychomotor retardation and agitation, increases in appetite, and distractibility predicted more severe levels of subsequent SI. Problems with concentration, distraction, sleep loss and decreased need for sleep predicted subsequent SI more strongly among individuals with a suicide attempt history. CONCLUSIONS: Several specific mood symptoms may confer risk for the onset or worsening of SI among treatment-seeking patients with BD. Individuals with a previous suicide attempt may be at greater risk in part due to greater reactivity to certain mood symptoms in the form of SI. However, overall, effect sizes were small, suggesting the need to identify additional proximal predictors of SI.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/da.22464
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
1103 Clinical Sciences
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082048

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 308 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 09 Mar 2016, 13:17:36 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.