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Perception of mattering and suicide ideation in the Australian working population: evidence from a cross-sectional survey

Milner, A., Page, K.M. and LaMontagne, A.D. 2016, Perception of mattering and suicide ideation in the Australian working population: evidence from a cross-sectional survey, Community mental health journal, vol. 52, no. 5, pp. 615-621, doi: 10.1007/s10597-016-0002-x.

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Title Perception of mattering and suicide ideation in the Australian working population: evidence from a cross-sectional survey
Author(s) Milner, A.ORCID iD for Milner, A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Page, K.M.
LaMontagne, A.D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, A.D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name Community mental health journal
Volume number 52
Issue number 5
Start page 615
End page 621
Total pages 7
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 0010-3853
1573-2789
Keyword(s) suicidal thoughts
suicide
mattering
social support
psychological distress
protective factors
Summary Thoughts about suicide are a risk factor for suicide deaths and attempts and are associated with a range of mental health outcomes. While there is considerable knowledge about risk factors for suicide ideation, there is little known about protective factors. The current study sought to understand the role of perceived mattering to others as a protective factor for suicide in a working sample of Australians using a cross-sectional research design. Logistic regression analysis indicated that people with a higher perception that they mattered had lower odds of suicide ideation than those with lower reported mattering, after controlling for psychological distress, demographic and relationship variables. These results indicate the importance of further research and intervention studies on mattering as a lever for reducing suicidality. Understanding more about protective factors for suicide ideation is important as this may prevent future adverse mental health and behavioural outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10597-016-0002-x
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
111714 Mental Health
1103 Clinical Sciences
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920405 Environmental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082227

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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