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Application of multi-criteria decision making methods to compression ignition engine efficiency and gaseous, particulate and greenhouse gas emissions

Surawski, Nicholas C, Miljevic, Branka, Bodisco, Timothy A, Brown, Richard J, Ristovski, Zoran D and Ayoko, Godwin A 2013, Application of multi-criteria decision making methods to compression ignition engine efficiency and gaseous, particulate and greenhouse gas emissions, Environmental science and technology, vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 1904-1912, doi: 10.1021/es3035208.

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Title Application of multi-criteria decision making methods to compression ignition engine efficiency and gaseous, particulate and greenhouse gas emissions
Author(s) Surawski, Nicholas C
Miljevic, Branka
Bodisco, Timothy AORCID iD for Bodisco, Timothy A orcid.org/0000-0002-5163-4762
Brown, Richard J
Ristovski, Zoran D
Ayoko, Godwin A
Journal name Environmental science and technology
Volume number 47
Issue number 4
Start page 1904
End page 1912
Total pages 9
Publisher American Chemical Society
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1520-5851
Keyword(s) ignition engine efficiency
gaseous emission
particulate emission
greenhouse gas emissions
Summary Compression ignition (CI) engine design is subject to many constraints which presents a multi-criteria optimisation problem that the engine researcher must solve. In particular, the modern CI engine must not only be efficient, but must also deliver low gaseous, particulate and life cycle greenhouse gas emissions so that its impact on urban air quality, human health, and global warming are minimised. Consequently, this study undertakes a multi-criteria analysis which seeks to identify alternative fuels, injection technologies and combustion strategies that could potentially satisfy these CI engine design constraints. Three datasets are analysed with the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations and Geometrical Analysis for Interactive Aid (PROMETHEE-GAIA) algorithm to explore the impact of 1): an ethanol fumigation system, 2): alternative fuels (20 % biodiesel and synthetic diesel) and alternative injection technologies (mechanical direct injection and common rail injection), and 3): various biodiesel fuels made from 3 feedstocks (i.e. soy, tallow, and canola) tested at several blend percentages (20-100 %) on the resulting emissions and efficiency profile of the various test engines. The results show that moderate ethanol substitutions (~20 % by energy) at moderate load, high percentage soy blends (60-100 %), and alternative fuels (biodiesel and synthetic diesel) provide an efficiency and emissions profile that yields the most “preferred” solutions to this multi-criteria engine design problem. Further research is, however, required to reduce Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) emissions with alternative fuels, and to deliver technologies that do not significantly reduce the median diameter of particle emissions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1021/es3035208
Field of Research 090599 Civil Engineering not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, American Chemical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082238

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Engineering
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