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Filling historical data gaps to foster solutions in marine conservation

Thurstan, R.H., McClenachan, L., Crowder, L.B., Drew, J.A., Kittinger, J.N., Levin, P.S., Roberts, C.M. and Pandolfi, J.M. 2015, Filling historical data gaps to foster solutions in marine conservation, Ocean and coastal management, vol. 115, pp. 31-40, doi: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.04.019.

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Title Filling historical data gaps to foster solutions in marine conservation
Author(s) Thurstan, R.H.ORCID iD for Thurstan, R.H. orcid.org/0000-0002-8045-1631
McClenachan, L.
Crowder, L.B.
Drew, J.A.
Kittinger, J.N.
Levin, P.S.
Roberts, C.M.
Pandolfi, J.M.
Journal name Ocean and coastal management
Volume number 115
Start page 31
End page 40
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-10
ISSN 0964-5691
Keyword(s) coastal management
fisheries
historical ecology
marine ecology
qualitative data
Summary Ecological data sets rarely extend back more than a few decades, limiting our understanding of environmental change and its drivers. Marine historical ecology has played a critical role in filling these data gaps by illuminating the magnitude and rate of ongoing changes in marine ecosystems. Yet despite a growing body of knowledge, historical insights are rarely explicitly incorporated in mainstream conservation and management efforts. Failing to consider historical change can have major implications for conservation, such as the ratcheting down of expectations of ecosystem quality over time, leading to less ambitious targets for recovery or restoration. We discuss several unconventional sources used by historical ecologists to fill data gaps - including menus, newspaper articles, cookbooks, museum collections, artwork, benthic sediment cores - and novel techniques for their analysis. We specify opportunities for the integration of historical data into conservation and management, and highlight the important role that these data can play in filling conservation data gaps and motivating conservation actions. As historical marine ecology research continues to grow as a multidisciplinary enterprise, great opportunities remain to foster direct linkages to conservation and improve the outlook for marine ecosystems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.04.019
Field of Research 050205 Environmental Management
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082250

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.