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Human residential status and habitat quality affect the likelihood but not the success of lapwing breeding in an urban matrix

Roche, Dylan V., Cardilini, Adam P.A., Lees, Daniel, Maguire, Grainne S., Dann, Peter, Sherman, Craig D.H. and Weston, Michael A. 2016, Human residential status and habitat quality affect the likelihood but not the success of lapwing breeding in an urban matrix, Science of the total environment, vol. 556, pp. 189-195, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.008.

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Title Human residential status and habitat quality affect the likelihood but not the success of lapwing breeding in an urban matrix
Author(s) Roche, Dylan V.
Cardilini, Adam P.A.
Lees, Daniel
Maguire, Grainne S.
Dann, Peter
Sherman, Craig D.H.ORCID iD for Sherman, Craig D.H. orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name Science of the total environment
Volume number 556
Start page 189
End page 195
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06-15
ISSN 0048-9697
Keyword(s) Disturbance
Garden
Masked lapwings
Settlement
Vanellus miles
Yard
Summary Wildlife living in the suburbs faces the challenge of dealing with human presence and yard management (including the occurrence of pets) which vary at the scale of the house block. This study examined the influence of ecological factors (e.g. extent of grass and food availability) and anthropogenic factors (e.g. human activity and garden usage) on breeding site choice and reproductive success of the ground-nesting masked lapwing Vanellus miles on Phillip Island, Australia. Lapwings nested less frequently in residential properties (high levels of human usage) compared with vacant blocks and holiday houses. They were also more likely to breed on properties with high food availability and larger areas of grass. None of these variables influenced clutch size or the probability of eggs hatching, although larger clutches and higher hatching rates tended to be associated with more food. This study shows that, for an urban exploiting species, habitat quality is not homogenous at the scale of the house block, and that human activity is avoided by a species generally considered highly tolerant of people.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.008
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 960812 Urban and Industrial Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082285

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Created: Thu, 21 Apr 2016, 10:48:27 EST

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