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Avian assemblages at bird baths: a comparison of urban and rural bird baths in Australia

Cleary, Gráinne P., Parsons, Holly, Davis, Adrian, Coleman, Bill R., Jones, Darryl N., Miller, Kelly K. and Weston, Michael A. 2016, Avian assemblages at bird baths: a comparison of urban and rural bird baths in Australia, PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150899.

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Title Avian assemblages at bird baths: a comparison of urban and rural bird baths in Australia
Author(s) Cleary, Gráinne P.
Parsons, Holly
Davis, Adrian
Coleman, Bill R.
Jones, Darryl N.
Miller, Kelly K.ORCID iD for Miller, Kelly K. orcid.org/0000-0003-4360-6232
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 11
Issue number 3
Article ID e0150899
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
BIOTIC HOMOGENIZATION
URBANIZATION
LANDSCAPE
HABITATS
GARDENS
FOOD
ENVIRONMENTS
COMMUNITIES
VEGETATION
ECOLOGY
Summary Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0150899
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 960812 Urban and Industrial Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082286

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.