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Statistically modelling the relationships between Type D personality and social support, health behaviors and symptom severity in chronic illness groups

Horwood, Sharon, Anglim, Jeromy and Tooley, Greg 2016, Statistically modelling the relationships between Type D personality and social support, health behaviors and symptom severity in chronic illness groups, Psychology & health, vol. 31, no. 9, pp. 1047-1063, doi: 10.1080/08870446.2016.1167209.

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Title Statistically modelling the relationships between Type D personality and social support, health behaviors and symptom severity in chronic illness groups
Author(s) Horwood, SharonORCID iD for Horwood, Sharon orcid.org/0000-0003-1943-643X
Anglim, JeromyORCID iD for Anglim, Jeromy orcid.org/0000-0002-1809-9315
Tooley, GregORCID iD for Tooley, Greg orcid.org/0000-0003-0191-3285
Journal name Psychology & health
Volume number 31
Issue number 9
Start page 1047
End page 1063
Total pages 17
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1476-8321
Keyword(s) Type D
personality
somatisation
functional somatic syndrome
chronic illness
Summary OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to develop a predictive model of how Type D personality influences health behaviours, social support and symptom severity and assess its generalisability to a range of chronic illnesses.

DESIGN: Participants were classified as either healthy (n = 182) or having a chronic illness (n = 207). Participants completed an online survey measuring Type D and a range of health-related variables. Chronic illness participants were classified as having either a functional somatic syndrome (i.e. chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia), where the underlying pathological processes were unclear, or illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, where the causes are well understood.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were health behaviours, social support and both physical and psychological symptoms.

RESULTS: The rate of Type D was higher in chronic illness participants (53%) than in healthy controls (39%). Negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) both correlated with outcome measures, although NA was generally the stronger predictor. Using NA and SI as independent subscales led to superior prediction of health outcomes than using categorical or continuous representations.

CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that the relationship between Type D and health outcomes may generalise across different chronic illnesses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2016.1167209
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
170109 Personality, Abilities and Assessment
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Informa UK
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082467

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Sat, 26 Mar 2016, 09:15:23 EST

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