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Adding fuel to the "fire of life": energy budgets across levels of variation in ectotherms and endotherms

Careau, Vincent, Killen, Shaun S. and Metcalfe, Neil B. 2015, Adding fuel to the "fire of life": energy budgets across levels of variation in ectotherms and endotherms. In Martin, Lynn B., Ghalambor, Cameron K. and Woods, H. Arthur (ed), Integrative organismal biology, Wiley Blackwell, London, Eng., pp.219-233, doi: 10.1002/9781118398814.ch14.

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Title Adding fuel to the "fire of life": energy budgets across levels of variation in ectotherms and endotherms
Author(s) Careau, Vincent
Killen, Shaun S.
Metcalfe, Neil B.
Title of book Integrative organismal biology
Editor(s) Martin, Lynn B.
Ghalambor, Cameron K.
Woods, H. Arthur
Publication date 2015
Start page 219
End page 233
Total pages 15
Publisher Wiley Blackwell
Place of Publication London, Eng.
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biology
Ecology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
BASAL METABOLIC-RATE
AEROBIC CAPACITY
SMALL MAMMALS
DEER MICE
EXPENDITURE
TEMPERATURE
BEHAVIOR
BIRDS
HEAT
PERFORMANCE
Summary Energy metabolism - the "fire of life" - is the sum of the processes by which animals acquire energy, channel energy into useful functions, and dissipate energy from their bodies. Acquisition and allocation processes deal with energy mainly as a quantity, but energy is absorbed or expended over a period of time; therefore, the most relevant way to conceptualize energy budgets is with the use of rate functions. A large number of recent studies have examined co-variation in metabolic and behavioral traits among individuals. A general finding stemming from this body of work is that there is no single cause-and-effect mechanism driving these relationships, but that the direction of the effects is dynamic and shifts in different contexts and environments. However, the remarkable energetic differences between endotherms and ectotherms are an unexploited basis for achieving a further understanding of such relationships.
ISBN 9781118398814
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/9781118398814.ch14
Field of Research 060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
ERA Research output type B Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082517

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