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Adaptation to urban environments promotes high reproductive success in the tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides), an endemic nocturnal bird species

Weaving, M. J., White, J. G., Isaac, B., Rendall, A. R. and Cooke, R. 2016, Adaptation to urban environments promotes high reproductive success in the tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides), an endemic nocturnal bird species, Landscape and urban planning, vol. 150, pp. 87-95, doi: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.03.001.

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Title Adaptation to urban environments promotes high reproductive success in the tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides), an endemic nocturnal bird species
Author(s) Weaving, M. J.
White, J. G.ORCID iD for White, J. G. orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Isaac, B.
Rendall, A. R.
Cooke, R.ORCID iD for Cooke, R. orcid.org/0000-0002-8843-7113
Journal name Landscape and urban planning
Volume number 150
Start page 87
End page 95
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 1872-6062
Keyword(s) Urbanisation gradient
Rainfall
Temperature
Breeding
Summary The tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) is an endemic, nocturnal bird species widespread throughout Australia with high numbers in urban environments but very limited information exists on its ability to cope with urban systems. We investigated the reproductive behaviour of this species in response to a continuum of urbanisation. Firstly, we asked does the degree of urbanisation influence the availability of suitable nesting locations. Secondly, does broad and/or local scale factors surrounding a nest influence reproductive success? And finally, does the degree of urbanisation influence time of breeding? We located 158 nest sites and monitored 189 breeding attempts across four breeding seasons (2010-2013). One hundred and thirty three of these attempts successfully fledged 177 chicks. We categorized 75 attempts as first known attempts for that season resulting in 77 fledged chicks. In some pairs, repeated attempts occurred after failure. We observed double brooding by three pairs, a strategy largely unknown in this species. Spatial modelling revealed that birds selected more vegetated areas of the gradient within which to locate their nests, avoiding more highly urbanized areas. We identified no association between land-use type and breeding success at both broad and local scales. Birds selected native rough-barked Eucalyptus tree species more frequently than other trees for nesting. The key drivers for the commencement of breeding were climatic variables, in particular rainfall. The ability of the species to synchronize breeding attempts to coincide with optimal environmental conditions resulted in extremely high reproductive success suggesting high individual fitness and an adaptation to local environmental conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.03.001
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060803 Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology
09 Engineering
05 Environmental Sciences
12 Built Environment And Design
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082536

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