Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: an observational design pilot study

Forbes, Helen, Bucknall, Tracey K. and Hutchinson, Alison M. 2016, Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: an observational design pilot study, Nurse education today, vol. 39, pp. 116-121, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.01.012.

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Title Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: an observational design pilot study
Author(s) Forbes, HelenORCID iD for Forbes, Helen orcid.org/0000-0001-8826-8156
Bucknall, Tracey K.ORCID iD for Bucknall, Tracey K. orcid.org/0000-0001-9089-3583
Hutchinson, Alison M.
Journal name Nurse education today
Volume number 39
Start page 116
End page 121
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1532-2793
Keyword(s) Debriefing
Decision-making
Feedback
Nursing
Patient safety
Simulation
Students
Video-recording
Summary BACKGROUND: Clinical decision-making is a complex activity that is critical to patient safety. Simulation, augmented by feedback, affords learners the opportunity to learn critical clinical decision-making skills. More detailed feedback following simulation exercises has the potential to further enhance student learning, particularly in relation to developing improved clinical decision-making skills. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of head-mounted video camera recordings, to augment feedback, following acute patient deterioration simulations. DESIGN: Pilot study using an observational design. METHODS: Ten final-year nursing students participated in three simulation exercises, each focussed on detection and management of patient deterioration. Two observers collected behavioural data using an adapted version of Gaba's Clinical Simulation Tool, to provide verbal feedback to each participant, following each simulation exercise. Participants wore a head-mounted video camera during the second simulation exercise only. Video recordings were replayed to participants to augment feedback, following the second simulation exercise. Data were collected on: participant performance (observed and perceived); participant perceptions of feedback methods; and head-mounted video camera recording feasibility and capability for detailed audio-visual feedback. RESULTS: Management of patient deterioration improved for six participants (60%). Increased perceptions of confidence (70%) and competence (80%), were reported by the majority of participants. Few participants (20%) agreed that the video recording specifically enhanced their learning. The visual field of the head-mounted video camera was not always synchronised with the participant's field of vision, thus affecting the usefulness of some recordings. CONCLUSION: The usefulness of the video recordings, to enhance verbal feedback to participants on detection and management of simulated patient deterioration, was inconclusive. Modification of the video camera glasses, to improve visual-field synchronisation with participants' actual visual field, is recommended to further explore this technology for enhancing student performance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.01.012
Field of Research 1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082595

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