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Hair cortisol levels, perceived stress and body mass index in women and children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods: the READI study

Olstad, Dana Lee, Ball, Kylie, Wright, Craig, Abbott, Gavin, Brown, Erin and Turner, Anne Isabella 2016, Hair cortisol levels, perceived stress and body mass index in women and children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods: the READI study, Stress, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 158-167, doi: 10.3109/10253890.2016.1160282.

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Title Hair cortisol levels, perceived stress and body mass index in women and children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods: the READI study
Author(s) Olstad, Dana Lee
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Wright, CraigORCID iD for Wright, Craig orcid.org/0000-0001-7903-3144
Abbott, Gavin
Brown, Erin
Turner, Anne IsabellaORCID iD for Turner, Anne Isabella orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Journal name Stress
Volume number 19
Issue number 2
Start page 158
End page 167
Total pages 10
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1607-8888
Keyword(s) BMI
Perceived psychological stress
acute stress
chronic stress
obesity
physiological stress
socioeconomic disadvantage
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY
SELF-REPORTED HEIGHT
PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS
RISK-FACTORS
MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS
HEALTH BEHAVIORS
NATIONAL-HEALTH
SOCIAL SUPPORT
WEIGHT-GAIN
SCALP HAIR
Summary Disadvantaged communities provide adverse psychosocial exposures that have been linked to high levels of stress, and this may provide one explanatory pathway linking socioeconomic disadvantage to obesity. This study used hair cortisol analysis to quantify associations between stress and body mass index (BMI), and between hair cortisol and perceived psychological stress levels, in women and children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods. Participants were a volunteer sample of 70 women from the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality study, including 30 maternal-child pairs. Women self-reported body weight, height and perceived psychological stress using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and provided hair samples for themselves and their child. Children's body weight and height were measured. Following extraction, hair cortisol levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multiple linear regression models examined associations between stress and BMI, and between hair cortisol and perceived stress levels in women and children. Women's hair cortisol levels were not associated with their BMI or PSS scores. Women's PSS scores were positively associated with their BMI (p = 0.015). Within maternal-child pairs, mothers and children's hair cortisol levels were strongly positively associated (p = 0.006). Maternal hair cortisol levels and PSS scores were unrelated to their child's zBMI. Children's hair cortisol levels were not associated with their zBMI or with their mother's PSS score. Findings suggest that cortisol-based and perceived psychological measures of stress may be distinct among women and children living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Perceived psychological measures may be more important predictors of weight-related risk.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/10253890.2016.1160282
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 374241
Copyright notice ©2016, Informa UK
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082730

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.