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The effect of sugar-free versus sugar-sweetened beverages on satiety, liking and wanting: an 18 month randomized double-blind trial in children

de Ruyter, Janne C., Katan, Martjin B., Kuijper, Lothar D. J., Liem, Djin G. and Olthof, Margreet R. 2013, The effect of sugar-free versus sugar-sweetened beverages on satiety, liking and wanting: an 18 month randomized double-blind trial in children, PLoS one, vol. 8, no. 10, Article number : e78039, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078039.

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Title The effect of sugar-free versus sugar-sweetened beverages on satiety, liking and wanting: an 18 month randomized double-blind trial in children
Author(s) de Ruyter, Janne C.
Katan, Martjin B.
Kuijper, Lothar D. J.
Liem, Djin G.ORCID iD for Liem, Djin G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6619-6101
Olthof, Margreet R.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 10
Season Article number : e78039
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013-10-22
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Adipose Tissue
Beverages
Child
Child, Preschool
Double-Blind Method
Female
Food Additives
Humans
Male
Satiety Response
Sweetening Agents
Time Factors
Summary BACKGROUND: Substituting sugar-free for sugar-sweetened beverages reduces weight gain. A possible explanation is that sugar-containing and sugar-free beverages cause the same degree of satiety. However, this has not been tested in long-term trials.

METHODS: We randomized 203 children aged 7-11 years to receive 250 mL per day of an artificially sweetened sugar-free beverage or a similarly looking and tasting sugar-sweetened beverage. We measured satiety on a 5-point scale by questionnaire at 0, 6, 12 and 18 months. We calculated the change in satiety from before intake to 1 minute after intake and 15 minutes after intake. We then calculated the odds ratio that satiety increased by 1 point in the sugar-group versus the sugar-free group. We also investigated how much the children liked and wanted the beverages.

RESULTS: 146 children or 72% completed the study. We found no statistically significant difference in satiety between the sugar-free and sugar-sweetened group; the adjusted odds ratio for a 1 point increase in satiety in the sugar group versus the sugar-free group was 0.77 at 1 minute (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.29), and 1.44 at 15 minutes after intake (95% CI, 0.86 to 2.40). The sugar-group liked and wanted their beverage slightly more than the sugar-free group, adjusted odds ratio 1.63 (95% CI 1.05 to 2.54) and 1.65 (95% CI 1.07 to 2.55), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Sugar-sweetened and sugar-free beverages produced similar satiety. Therefore when children are given sugar-free instead of sugar-containing drinks they might not make up the missing calories from other sources. This may explain our previous observation that children in the sugar-free group accumulated less body fat than those in the sugar group.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0078039
Field of Research 090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082768

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.