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The long road from the kidney bazaar: a commentary on Pakistan’s progress towards self-sufficiency in organ transplantation

Martin, Dominique 2011, The long road from the kidney bazaar: a commentary on Pakistan’s progress towards self-sufficiency in organ transplantation, PORTAL journal of multidisciplinary international studies, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.5130/portal.v8i2.1833.

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Title The long road from the kidney bazaar: a commentary on Pakistan’s progress towards self-sufficiency in organ transplantation
Author(s) Martin, Dominique
Journal name PORTAL journal of multidisciplinary international studies
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher University of Technology Sydney ePress
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 1449-2490
Keyword(s) transplant tourism
organ transplantation
national self-sufficiency
bioethics
Pakistan
self-sufficiency
ethics
Summary The dark history of transplant tourism in Pakistan demonstrates the hazards of unregulated cross-border markets in human organs. Trading on existing national and international social inequities, ‘transplant tourism’ offers dubious benefits for transplant recipients and attractive profits to those facilitating the industry at the expense of the world’s poor. The impact of Pakistan’s 2007 Transplantation of Human Organs and Tissue Ordinance and the sustained efforts of transplant professionals and societal groups led by the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, show that organ trading can be effectively discouraged and equitable programs of organ procurement and transplantation pursued despite multiple challenges. In this paper, the factors that have contributed to Pakistan’s progress towards self-sufficiency in organ transplantation are identified and discussed. The case of Pakistan highlights the need for countries to protect their own organ and tissue providers who may be vulnerable in the global healthcare market. Pakistan provides an excellent example for other countries in the region and throughout the world to consider when regulating their own transplantation programs and considering the pursuit of national self-sufficiency.
Language eng
DOI 10.5130/portal.v8i2.1833
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
2002 Cultural Studies
2005 Literary Studies
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082808

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.