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‘Fat, four-eyed and female’ 30 years later: A replication of Harris, Harris, and Bochner’s (1982) early study of obesity stereotypes

Grant, Sharon L., Mizzi, Toby and Anglim, Jeromy 2016, ‘Fat, four-eyed and female’ 30 years later: A replication of Harris, Harris, and Bochner’s (1982) early study of obesity stereotypes, Australian journal of psychology, vol. 68, no. 4, pp. 290-300, doi: 10.1111/ajpy.12107.

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Title ‘Fat, four-eyed and female’ 30 years later: A replication of Harris, Harris, and Bochner’s (1982) early study of obesity stereotypes
Author(s) Grant, Sharon L.
Mizzi, Toby
Anglim, JeromyORCID iD for Anglim, Jeromy orcid.org/0000-0002-1809-9315
Journal name Australian journal of psychology
Volume number 68
Issue number 4
Start page 290
End page 300
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1742-9536
Keyword(s) anti-fat attitudes
obesity
stereotypes
weight stigma
Summary Objective: This study aimed to replicate Harris, Harris, and Bochner’s (1982) early experiment on obesity stereotyping to examine whether negative obesity stereotypes persist and in what form.

Method: A sample of psychology students (N = 506) read a description of a target described as female or male, overweight or average weight, and wearing glasses or not, who they subsequently rated on 12 descriptors.

Results: Overweight targets were rated as significantly less active, assertive, athletic, attractive, happy, hardworking, masculine, popular, and successful than average weight targets. This negative stereotype effect of target weight was much larger than effects observed for sex or wearing glasses. There were no differences in effect sizes for target weight between this study and the original study.

Conclusions:
It was concluded that the negative obesity stereotypes reported by Harris et al. have persisted over a 30-year period, despite the fact that people who are overweight are no longer a minority. Efforts are needed to challenge negative stereotyping of this group. Future research could examine why stereotypes of overweight people are resistant to change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ajpy.12107
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082972

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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