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The combination of plyometric and balance training improves sprint and shuttle run performances more often than plyometric-only training with children

Chaouachi, Anis, Othman, Aymen Ben, Hammami, Raouf, Drinkwater, Eric J. and Behm, David G. 2014, The combination of plyometric and balance training improves sprint and shuttle run performances more often than plyometric-only training with children, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 401-412, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182987059.

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Title The combination of plyometric and balance training improves sprint and shuttle run performances more often than plyometric-only training with children
Author(s) Chaouachi, Anis
Othman, Aymen Ben
Hammami, Raouf
Drinkwater, Eric J.ORCID iD for Drinkwater, Eric J. orcid.org/0000-0002-9594-9360
Behm, David G.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 28
Issue number 2
Start page 401
End page 412
Total pages 12
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadephia, Pa.
Publication date 2014-02
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Keyword(s) youth
stretch-shortening cycle
jumps
stability
agility
magnitude-based inferences
Summary Because balance is not fully developed in children and studies have shown functional improvements with balance only training studies, a combination of plyometric and balance activities might enhance static balance, dynamic balance, and power. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of plyometric only (PLYO) with balance and plyometric (COMBINED) training on balance and power measures in children. Before and after an 8-week training period, testing assessed lower-body strength (1 repetition maximum leg press), power (horizontal and vertical jumps, triple hop for distance, reactive strength, and leg stiffness), running speed (10-m and 30-m sprint), static and dynamic balance (Standing Stork Test and Star Excursion Balance Test), and agility (shuttle run). Subjects were randomly divided into 2 training groups (PLYO [n = 14] and COMBINED [n = 14]) and a control group (n = 12). Results based on magnitude-based inferences and precision of estimation indicated that the COMBINED training group was considered likely to be superior to the PLYO group in leg stiffness (d = 0.69, 91% likely), 10-m sprint (d = 0.57, 84% likely), and shuttle run (d = 0.52, 80% likely). The difference between the groups was unclear in 8 of the 11 dependent variables. COMBINED training enhanced activities such as 10-m sprints and shuttle runs to a greater degree. COMBINED training could be an important consideration for reducing the high velocity impacts of PLYO training. This reduction in stretch-shortening cycle stress on neuromuscular system with the replacement of balance and landing exercises might help to alleviate the overtraining effects of excessive repetitive high load activities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182987059
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082988

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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