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Application of dried blood spots to determine vitamin D status in a large nutritional study with unsupervised sampling: the Food4Me project

Hoeller, Ulrich, Baur, Manuela, Roos, Franz F., Brennan, Lorraine, Daniel, Hannelore, Fallaize, Rosalind, Forster, Hannah, Gibney, Eileen R., Gibney, Mike, Godlewska, Magdalena, Hartwig, Kai, Kolossa, Silvia, Lambrinou, Christina P., Livingstone, Katherine M., Lovegrove, Julie A., Macready, Anna L., Manios, Yannis, Marsaux, Cyril F. M., Martinez, J. Alfredo, Celis-Morales, Carlos, Moschonis, George, Navas-Carretero, Santiago, O'Donovan, Clare B., San-Cristobal, Rodrigo, Saris, Wim H. M., Surwiłło, Agnieszka, Traczyk, Iwona, Tsirigoti, Lydia, Walsh, Marianne C., Woolhead, Clara, Mathers, John C. and Weber, Peter 2016, Application of dried blood spots to determine vitamin D status in a large nutritional study with unsupervised sampling: the Food4Me project, British journal of nutrition, vol. 115, no. 2, pp. 202-211, doi: 10.1017/S0007114515004298.

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Title Application of dried blood spots to determine vitamin D status in a large nutritional study with unsupervised sampling: the Food4Me project
Author(s) Hoeller, Ulrich
Baur, Manuela
Roos, Franz F.
Brennan, Lorraine
Daniel, Hannelore
Fallaize, Rosalind
Forster, Hannah
Gibney, Eileen R.
Gibney, Mike
Godlewska, Magdalena
Hartwig, Kai
Kolossa, Silvia
Lambrinou, Christina P.
Livingstone, Katherine M.ORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Lovegrove, Julie A.
Macready, Anna L.
Manios, Yannis
Marsaux, Cyril F. M.
Martinez, J. Alfredo
Celis-Morales, Carlos
Moschonis, George
Navas-Carretero, Santiago
O'Donovan, Clare B.
San-Cristobal, Rodrigo
Saris, Wim H. M.
Surwiłło, Agnieszka
Traczyk, Iwona
Tsirigoti, Lydia
Walsh, Marianne C.
Woolhead, Clara
Mathers, John C.
Weber, Peter
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 115
Issue number 2
Start page 202
End page 211
Total pages 10
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1475-2662
Keyword(s) 25(OH)D2 25-Hydroxy vitamin D2
25(OH)D3 25-hydroxy vitamin D3
Analytical methods
DBS dried blood spots
Dried blood spot sampling
LOD limit of detection
LOQ limit of quantitation
MeOH methanol
Nutrition intervention study Food4Me
RT room temperature
Vitamin D status
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Calcifediol
Calibration
Desiccation
Diet Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Paper
Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
Reference Values
Remote Consultation
Reproducibility of Results
Seasons
Sensitivity and Specificity
Vitamin D Deficiency
Food4Me project
Summary An efficient and robust method to measure vitamin D (25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and 25-hydroxy vitamin D2 in dried blood spots (DBS) has been developed and applied in the pan-European multi-centre, internet-based, personalised nutrition intervention study Food4Me. The method includes calibration with blood containing endogenous 25(OH)D3, spotted as DBS and corrected for haematocrit content. The methodology was validated following international standards. The performance characteristics did not reach those of the current gold standard liquid chromatography-MS/MS in plasma for all parameters, but were found to be very suitable for status-level determination under field conditions. DBS sample quality was very high, and 3778 measurements of 25(OH)D3 were obtained from 1465 participants. The study centre and the season within the study centre were very good predictors of 25(OH)D3 levels (P<0·001 for each case). Seasonal effects were modelled by fitting a sine function with a minimum 25(OH)D3 level on 20 January and a maximum on 21 July. The seasonal amplitude varied from centre to centre. The largest difference between winter and summer levels was found in Germany and the smallest in Poland. The model was cross-validated to determine the consistency of the predictions and the performance of the DBS method. The Pearson's correlation between the measured values and the predicted values was r 0·65, and the sd of their differences was 21·2 nmol/l. This includes the analytical variation and the biological variation within subjects. Overall, DBS obtained by unsupervised sampling of the participants at home was a viable methodology for obtaining vitamin D status information in a large nutritional study.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0007114515004298
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
0702 Animal Production
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
0908 Food Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30082994

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.