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Olympic weightlifting and plyometric training with children provides similar or greater performance improvements than traditional resistance training

Chaouachi, Anis, Hammami, Raouf, Kaabi, Sofiene, Chamari, Karim, Drinkwater, Eric J. and Behm, David G. 2014, Olympic weightlifting and plyometric training with children provides similar or greater performance improvements than traditional resistance training, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 1483-1496, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000305.

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Title Olympic weightlifting and plyometric training with children provides similar or greater performance improvements than traditional resistance training
Author(s) Chaouachi, Anis
Hammami, Raouf
Kaabi, Sofiene
Chamari, Karim
Drinkwater, Eric J.
Behm, David G.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 28
Issue number 6
Start page 1483
End page 1496
Total pages 14
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2014-06
ISSN 1533-4287
Keyword(s) youth
adolescence
strength
power
balance
magnitude-based inferences
Summary A number of organizations recommend that advanced resistance training (RT) techniques can be implemented with children. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Olympic-style weightlifting (OWL), plyometrics, and traditional RT programs with children. Sixty-three children (10-12 years) were randomly allocated to a 12-week control OWL, plyometric, or traditional RT program. Pre- and post-training tests included body mass index (BMI), sum of skinfolds, countermovement jump (CMJ), horizontal jump, balance, 5- and 20-m sprint times, isokinetic force and power at 60 and 300° · s(-1). Magnitude-based inferences were used to analyze the likelihood of an effect having a standardized (Cohen's) effect size exceeding 0.20. All interventions were generally superior to the control group. Olympic weightlifting was >80% likely to provide substantially better improvements than plyometric training for CMJ, horizontal jump, and 5- and 20-m sprint times, whereas >75% likely to substantially exceed traditional RT for balance and isokinetic power at 300° · s(-1). Plyometric training was >78% likely to elicit substantially better training adaptations than traditional RT for balance, isokinetic force at 60 and 300° · s(-1), isokinetic power at 300° · s(-1), and 5- and 20-m sprints. Traditional RT only exceeded plyometric training for BMI and isokinetic power at 60° · s(-1). Hence, OWL and plyometrics can provide similar or greater performance adaptations for children. It is recommended that any of the 3 training modalities can be implemented under professional supervision with proper training progressions to enhance training adaptations in children.
Language eng
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000305
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083009

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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