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Maximum power point tracking techniques for photovoltaic systems: a comprehensive review and comparative analysis

Lyden, S and Haque, M. E. 2015, Maximum power point tracking techniques for photovoltaic systems: a comprehensive review and comparative analysis, Renewable and sustainable energy reviews, vol. 52, pp. 1504-1518, doi: 10.1016/j.rser.2015.07.172.

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Title Maximum power point tracking techniques for photovoltaic systems: a comprehensive review and comparative analysis
Author(s) Lyden, S
Haque, M. E.ORCID iD for Haque, M. E. orcid.org/0000-0002-8893-2181
Journal name Renewable and sustainable energy reviews
Volume number 52
Start page 1504
End page 1518
Total pages 15
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 1364-0321
Keyword(s) Maximum Power Point Tracking
Partial Shading Conditions
Photovoltaic cells
Summary Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) is an important concern in Photovoltaic (PV) systems. As PV systems have a high cost of energy it is essential that they are operated to extract the maximum possible power at all times. However, under non-uniform environmental conditions, which frequently arise in the outdoor environment, many MPPT techniques will fail to track the global peak power. This review paper discusses conventional MPPT techniques designed to operate under uniform environmental conditions and highlights why these techniques fail under non-uniform conditions. Following this, techniques designed specifically to operate under non-uniform environmental conditions are analysed and compared. Simulation results which compare the performance of the common Perturb and Observe (P&O) method, the Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) and the Simulated Annealing (SA) MPPT approaches under non-uniform environmental conditions are also presented. The research presented in this review indicates that there is no single technique which can achieve reliable global MPPT with low cost and complexity and be easily adapted to different PV systems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.rser.2015.07.172
Field of Research 090608 Renewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl Solar Cells)
Socio Economic Objective 850504 Solar-Photovoltaic Energy
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083031

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Engineering
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