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Psychosocial job quality in a national sample of working Australians: a comparison of persons working with versus without disability

LaMontagne, Anthony D., Krnjacki, L., Milner, A., Butterworth, P. and Kavanagh, A. 2016, Psychosocial job quality in a national sample of working Australians: a comparison of persons working with versus without disability, SSM - population health, vol. 2, pp. 175-181, doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2016.03.001.

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Title Psychosocial job quality in a national sample of working Australians: a comparison of persons working with versus without disability
Author(s) LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Krnjacki, L.
Milner, A.
Butterworth, P.
Kavanagh, A.
Journal name SSM - population health
Volume number 2
Start page 175
End page 181
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 2352-8273
Keyword(s) impairment
disability employment
equity
job stressors
psychosocial
working conditions
epidemiology
Summary Objectives: There is growing international policy interest in disability employment, yet there has been little investigation of job quality among people working with disability. This study uses Australian national data to compare the psychosocial job quality of people working with versus without disability. Methods: We used 10 annual waves of data from a large representative Australian panel survey to estimate the proportion of the population experiencing poorer psychosocial job quality (overall and by individual 'adversities' of low job control, high demands, high insecurity, and low fairness of pay) by disability status and impairment type. We used logistic regression to examine the pooled cross-sectional associations between disability and job quality, adjusting for age, sex, education and job type. Results: Those working with any disability showed approximately 25% higher odds of reporting one or more adversity at work (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.31), and this finding was consistent across impairment types with the exception of intellectual/developmental disability. Estimates were largely unchanged after adjustments. Similar results were found for reporting two or more adversities compared one or more. Conclusions: We observed that working people with a disability in Australia reported systematically poorer psychosocial job quality than those working without disability. These results suggest the need for further research to understand the reasons for these patterns, as well as policy and practice efforts to address this inequity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2016.03.001
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083038

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Population Health
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