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Fitness outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of exercise training for men with prostate cancer: the ENGAGE study

Gaskin, Cadeyrn J., Fraser, Steven F., Owen, Patrick J., Craike, Melinda, Orellana, Liliana and Livingston, Patricia M. 2016, Fitness outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of exercise training for men with prostate cancer: the ENGAGE study, Journal of cancer survivorship, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 972-980, doi: 10.1007/s11764-016-0543-6.

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Title Fitness outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of exercise training for men with prostate cancer: the ENGAGE study
Author(s) Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.
Fraser, Steven F.
Owen, Patrick J.
Craike, Melinda
Orellana, Liliana
Livingston, Patricia M.
Journal name Journal of cancer survivorship
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Start page 972
End page 980
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1932-2259
1932-2267
Keyword(s) prostate cancer
androgen deprivation therapy
aerobic exercise training
resistance exercise training
fitness
physical function
Summary Purpose The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week, clinician-referred, community-based exercise training program with supervised and unsupervised sessions for men with prostate cancer. The secondary purpose was to determine whether androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) modified responses to exercise training.

Methods Secondary analysis was undertaken on data from a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in which 15 clinicians were randomly assigned to refer eligible patients to an exercise training intervention (n = 8) or to provide usual care (n = 7). Data from 119 patients (intervention n = 53, control n = 66) were available for this analysis. Outcome measures included fitness and physical function, anthropometrics, resting heart rate, and blood pressure.

Results Compared to the control condition, men in the intervention significantly improved their 6-min walk distance (Mdiff = 49.98 m, padj = 0.001), leg strength (Mdiff = 21.82 kg, padj = 0.001), chest strength (Mdiff = 6.91 kg, padj = 0.001), 30-s sit-to-stand result (Mdiff = 3.38 reps, padj = 0.001), and reach distance (Mdiff = 4.8 cm, padj = 0.024). A significant difference (unadjusted for multiplicity) in favour of men in the intervention was also found for resting heart rate (Mdiff = −3.76 beats/min, p = 0.034). ADT did not modify responses to exercise training.

Conclusions Men with prostate cancer who act upon clinician referrals to community-based exercise training programs can improve their strength, physical functioning, and, potentially, cardiovascular health, irrespective of whether or not they are treated with ADT.

Implications for Cancer Survivors Clinicians should inform men with prostate cancer about the benefits of exercise and refer them to appropriately qualified exercise practitioners and suitable community-based programs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0543-6
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083041

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.