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Effects of resistance or aerobic exercise training on interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and body composition

Donges, Cheyne E., Duffield, Rob and Drinkwater, Eric J. 2010, Effects of resistance or aerobic exercise training on interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and body composition, Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 304-313, doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181b117ca.

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Title Effects of resistance or aerobic exercise training on interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and body composition
Author(s) Donges, Cheyne E.
Duffield, Rob
Drinkwater, Eric J.
Journal name Medicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume number 42
Issue number 2
Start page 304
End page 313
Total pages 10
Publisher Lippincott William & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2010-02
ISSN 1530-0315
Keyword(s) diabetes
cardiovascular disease (CVD)
dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)
sedentary
weight training
endurance training
Summary PURPOSE: To determine the effects of 10 wk of resistance or aerobic exercise training on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Further, to determine pretraining and posttraining associations between alterations of IL-6 and CRP and alterations of total body fat mass (TB-FM), intra-abdominal fat mass (IA-FM), and total body lean mass (TB-LM). METHODS: A sample of 102 sedentary subjects were assigned to a resistance group (n = 35), an aerobic group (n = 41), or a control group (n = 26). Before and after intervention, subjects were involved in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, muscular strength and aerobic fitness, measurements and further provided a resting fasted venous blood sample for measures of IL-6, CRP, cholesterol profile, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin. The resistance and the aerobic groups completed a respective 10-wk supervised and periodized training program, whereas the control group maintained sedentary lifestyle and dietary patterns. RESULTS: Both exercise training programs did not reduce IL-6; however, the resistance and the aerobic groups reduced CRP by 32.8% (P < 0.05) and 16.1% (P = 0.06), respectively. At baseline, CRP was positively correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.35), (TB-FM) (r = 0.36), and IA-FM (r = 0.31) and was inversely correlated with aerobic fitness measures (all r values > or = -0.24). Compared with the resistance and the control groups, the aerobic group exhibited significant (P < 0.05) improvements in all aerobic fitness measures and significant reductions in IA-FM (7.4%) and body mass (1.1%). Compared with the aerobic and the control groups, the resistance group significantly (P < 0.05) improved TB-FM (3.7%) and upper (46.3%) and lower (56.6%) body strength. CONCLUSION: Despite no alteration in baseline IL-6 and significantly smaller reductions in measures of adipose tissue as compared with the aerobic training group, only resistance exercise training resulted in significant attenuation of CRP concentration.
Language eng
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181b117ca
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, The American College of Sports Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083065

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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