Can a health coaching intervention delivered during pregnancy help prevent excessive gestational weight gain?

Hill, Briony, Skouteris, Helen, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew and Mcphie, Skye 2016, Can a health coaching intervention delivered during pregnancy help prevent excessive gestational weight gain?, Journal of behavioral medicine, vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 793-803, doi: 10.1007/s10865-016-9743-9.

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Title Can a health coaching intervention delivered during pregnancy help prevent excessive gestational weight gain?
Author(s) Hill, BrionyORCID iD for Hill, Briony orcid.org/0000-0003-4993-3963
Skouteris, Helen
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Mcphie, Skye
Journal name Journal of behavioral medicine
Volume number 39
Issue number 5
Start page 793
End page 803
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 1573-3521
Keyword(s) behavioural medicine
gestational weight gain
health behaviour change
health coaching
intervention studies
motivation
Summary This study evaluated: (1) the efficacy of a health coaching (HC) intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG); and (2) whether there were improved psychological, motivational, and behavioural outcomes for women in the HC intervention compared to a "usual care" control group. In this quasi-experimental study, 267 pregnant women ≤18 weeks gestation were recruited between August 2011 and June 2013 from two hospital antenatal clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Intervention women received four individual HC and two group HC/educational sessions informed by theories of behaviour change. Women completed questionnaires assessing psychological, motivational and behavioural outcomes at 16-18 (baseline) and 33 (post-intervention) weeks gestation. Weight measures were collected. Compared to usual care, the intervention did not limit GWG or prevent excessive GWG. However, HC women reported greater use of active coping skills post-intervention. Despite lack of success of the HC intervention, given the risks associated with excessive weight gain in pregnancy, health professionals should continue to recommend appropriate GWG.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10865-016-9743-9
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID GNT1018000
GNT1009324
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083123

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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